Shelley Berkley statement on Senator Dean Heller’s vote against bringing transparency to campaign advertising

Berkley Highlights Senator Heller’s Opposition To DISCLOSE Act, Says Heller Will Go To Any Length To Protect His Wall Street Special Interest Backers

Berkley In Favor Of Transparency In Campaign Advertising, Co-sponsored DISCLOSE Act Last Congress and Would Like To Vote On It Again This Year

Las Vegas- Today, U.S. Senate candidate Shelley Berkley issued the following statement following Senator Dean Heller’s vote against the DISCLOSE Act (Democracy Is Strengthened by Casting Light On Spending in Elections Act). The bill would bring transparency to campaign advertising by requiring disclosure of campaign donations in excess of $10,000. The bill treats all political entities equally – whether they are unions, corporations, business associations or Super PACs.

“By opposing a common sense bill that would bring much needed transparency to political advertising, Senator Dean Heller has once again proven he’ll go to any length to protect his special interest backers. While I was proud to co-sponsor and vote for the DISCLOSE Act last Congress, and would do so again if it comes up for a vote in the House of Representatives this Congress, Senator Heller opposed it and put his Wall Street contributors ahead of Nevada’s middle-class. I continue to remain deeply committed to the notion that Nevada middle-class families should come first, not Wall Street special interests.”

BACKGROUND

2010: Heller Voted Against Campaign Finance Bill To Curtail “The Ability Of Corporations And Other Special Interest Groups To Influence Elections.” In 2010, Heller voted against the Democracy is Strengthened by Casting Light on Spending in Elections Act (DISCLOSE) Act. According to the New York Times, the legislation will “curtail the ability of corporations and other special interest groups to influence elections by requiring greater disclosure of their role in paying for campaign advertising. The bill is intended to counter a Supreme Court ruling…that the federal government may not ban political spending by corporations and other advocacy groups, like labor unions…the bill would ban spending on political campaigns by corporations that have $10 million or more in government contracts as well as by American corporations that are controlled by foreign citizens. The bill would also establish rules and restrictions for American corporations and interest groups, including a prohibition of corporations and other interest groups in coordinating spending with candidates or political parties, and a mandate that chief executives appear in any advertisement paid for by their companies.” The bill passed 219-206. [H.R. 5175, Vote #391, 6/24/10; New York Times, 6/24/10]

Berkley Co-Sponsored And Voted For Campaign Finance Bill To Curtail “The Ability Of Corporations And Other Special Interest Groups To Influence Elections.” In 2010, Berkley co-sponsored and voted for the Democracy is Strengthened by Casting Light on Spending in Elections Act (DISCLOSE) Act. According to the New York Times, the legislation will “curtail the ability of corporations and other special interest groups to influence elections by requiring greater disclosure of their role in paying for campaign advertising. The bill is intended to counter a Supreme Court ruling…that the federal government may not ban political spending by corporations and other advocacy groups, like labor unions…the bill would ban spending on political campaigns by corporations that have $10 million or more in government contracts as well as by American corporations that are controlled by foreign citizens. The bill would also establish rules and restrictions for American corporations and interest groups, including a prohibition of corporations and other interest groups in coordinating spending with candidates or political parties, and a mandate that chief executives appear in any advertisement paid for by their companies.” The bill passed 219-206. [H.R. 5175, Vote #391, 6/24/10; New York Times, 6/24/10]

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