Did George Lucas Sell Star Wars to Disney Just For the Money?

Hollywood is still reeling over Disney’s newest acquisition, which brought Luke, Leia, Chewbacca, Han and gang into the Mouse house. On Tuesday, October 30, George Lucas sold Lucasfilm for more than $4 billion as Disney strengthen its merchandising power. But one has to wonder, did Lucas sell Star Wars just for the money or was the director interested in his prized creation’s longevity.

“It was a perfect match of two companies that are constructed similarly,” Lucas said. “It will give me a chance to go off and explore my own interests [and] at the same time feel completely confident that Disney will take good care of the franchise that I’ve built.”

What seems to have Hollywood chatter peaking is the fact that Lucas sold his entire franchise to Disney with the open endorsement that the Big Mouse could make “Star Wars” movies for “another 100 years,” that entire worldview is up for revision.

The deal, of course, left many thinking that Lucas might be doing the deal solely for money. Who wouldn’t think that, $4 billion is no drop in the bucket.

Another reason Lucas may have settle on Disney is because he has always seen “Star Wars” as having a perennial destiny. Perhaps it is truly an entire universe in which Luke and Han and Leia occupy only a small but important part.

In a Youtube.com video Lucas expresses in detail the reasons he chose to do business with Disney, point to their success with Marvel and Pixar.

The good news for fans is that they will not only get an episode seven, but, in fact, an entire new trilogy. “I always said I wasn’t going to do any more, and that’s true, I’m not going to do any more,” said Lucas, who will not write or direct the upcoming films, but whose iconic imprint will be all over them.

“It was a perfect match of two companies that are constructed similarly,” Lucas said. “It will give me a chance to go off and explore my own interests [and] at the same time feel completely confident that Disney will take good care of the franchise that I’ve built.”

The best news of all? “We have a large group of ideas and characters and books and all kinds of things,” Lucas said. “We could go on making ‘Star Wars’ for the next 100 years.”

For those afraid of the MouseHouse takeover, in the end, the overall deal with Lucasfilm proves that Disney wants to really make (and take) its role as parent company seriously. By fostering a variety of creative studios (Pixar, Marvel, and now Lucasfilm), rather than creating in-house content—which has, at times, been a bit spotty these days, let’s be honest—they stand to not only make a lot more money (shocker!) by acquiring these brands, but also allow these creatives a bit more freedom to develop themselves and their technologies. And for Disney, that means a lot less competition for their demographic expansion. Countering Fairytale Princesses with Sith Lords! It’s a heck of a business plan.