10 Reasons Why NBC Should Have Cancelled “The Office”

10 Reasons Why NBC Should Have Cancelled "The Office"

Some T.V. couch potatoes might find it extremely difficult to believe that NBC’s hit comedy, “The Office,” could have ever been a hit. Perhaps, an even more troubling factoid to consider is that from its first episode up to the show’s ninth season critics consistently characterized “The Office” as extremely funny.

In its first season, New York Times critic Alessandra Stanley wrote; “the American version of “The Office” is very funny.” But in the same breath, Stanley, remarked; “Luckily for NBC, which brought the rights to the British comedy, only a relatively small number of viewers in the United States have seen the BBC version. Those happy few should try to erase every trace from their brains.”

While critics have a right to a particular point of view, I nevertheless, couldn’t distinguish nor extrapolate differences between either version that were significant enough to overcome the show’s silly assault on American ethnics and racial stereotypes. In fact, in most instances the show distastefully exploited racial stereotypes for laughs, while enhancing the kind of prejudicial language that divides Americans.

That such shallow ignorance could pass for art or acting stifles imagination and artistic integrity, while dangerously cultivating apathy and neglect. In other words, “The Office” contributes nothing to enhance human experiences, celebrate human accomplishments, nor does it inspire us to self-reflect. Instead, the show took pleasure in demeaning diversity while reinforcing the simulative aspect of our crude misconceptions of others. It seemed to convey one message, over and over again. That is, empathy is for the weak.

I simply don’t find laughing at misfortune or ignorance funny. Perhaps it can evoke a momentary chuckle every now and then, but for nine seasons? How could it not desensitize the complacent? More importantly, how did it earn critical acclaim?

According to published reports, NBC has set the date for “The Office” series finale.

The network announced that the hit show will end after nine seasons on May 16 at 9 p.m. It will not only be a special one-hour episode, but also the show’s 200th episode.

Just think, It took 200 episodes before somebody decided to stop the madness.

Do you know how many episodes it should have taken for someone to say enough?

Two; the series pilot, and the episode that followed, Diversity Day.

As stated in my opening title, there are 10 reasons why NBC should have cancelled “The Office;” and all 10 can be found in the show’s first two episodes.

While I found almost nothing to be critical of as the pilot opened until Steve Carell began to imitate a scene from the movie “The Godfather.” Thus, the list of 10 begins:

1) Carell’s imitation Indian accent was extremely distressful in the pilot. Moreover, he was not the least bit humorous.

2) Carell’s Hitler imitation

3) Carell Answers a African American person sarcastically and in broken English. The impersonation was horrible

4) He then begins to pretends to fire a sensitive female employee in front of a new employee; very distasteful.

5) Steve Carell attempts to imitate a scene from the movie “The Godfather.” which would not be so bad except here again he not only gets the accent wrong, instead of sounding Italian, Carell uses an Indian accent. The entire scene is quite dreadful.

6) In the second episode Steve Carell’s character, Michael Scott launches the first of many more racially charged remarks as he interrupts the Diversity Day workshop instructor to declare a color free zone.

The episode steps all over its message, which reveals that people go out of their way to prove their tolerance of others.

7) Carell quickly takes over the workshop, and instructs employees to share which race each individual finds sexually attractive.

8) Carell’s loud and aggressive imitation of an agree black person is not only disturbing, abusive, and painfully disrespectful it was extremely offensive. want to have a good time this is Carell changing his voice

9) slavery vs holocaust distasteful remark was made near the close

10) Carell goes into one last tirade and begins to address Kelly who is of Indian decent. Struggling to sound like an Indian 7/11 store owner, his performance provokes her into slapping him in the face.

In my opinion, the farewell season of The Office should have began 9 seasons ago after the second episode. Those of you that never found time to see any of it more than 180 episodes should consider yourselves lucky. Those of you that watched the insanity weekly, I can only hope for your recovery in the months that follow the last episode.

6 Responses to "10 Reasons Why NBC Should Have Cancelled “The Office”"

  1. TheOfficeLover   August 4, 2017 at 1:08 pm

    why are these all of these from Michael Scott (Carrel) all of the imitations are meant to be bad and are meant to be offensive because he is trying not to be racist or offensive that’s the entire point.

    Reply
  2. jido   June 11, 2015 at 3:34 pm

    The writer for this is butthurt and lacking sense of humor. The Office is one of a kind, extremely funny show.

    Reply
  3. Josh Williams   October 4, 2014 at 5:26 am

    Completely agree with the 3 comments.
    This show is hilarious.
    Carells character relates to most jobs, where the boss is an idiot.
    I was disappointed to hear the show had ended.
    Also to the person who wrote this statement, watch more than two episodes and you will love it.

    Reply
  4. Troy   February 9, 2013 at 12:42 pm

    You based every reason to cancel an award winning sitcom off of the parts of the first two episodes you didn’t like. How can you possibly criticize a show with almost 200 episodes off of 2? You don’t actually give reasons to what you feel is wrong with the show, but scenes from the FIRST TWO EPISODES to cancel a series. In the words of Stanley Hudson, “You are a professional idiot”

    Reply
  5. buufo   February 7, 2013 at 7:56 pm

    Dear writer,

    Carell’s character was wildly offensive because that makes him more relatable. The other office employees who are horrified by his antics are the characters that initially the audience directly relates to, and Carell’s character embodies the indirect relatability to the stereotypical narcissistic man-child boss that everyone hates, but nobody has the authority to fire.

    If you fail to see the allegory and are hopelessly offended by these mock stereotypes, then you should stick to watching shows that are more on your level of comprehension, like Teletubbies reruns.

    Reply
  6. preet   February 7, 2013 at 7:31 pm

    Which idiot wrote this ?

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.