NASA: 2 Coronal Mass Ejections’ Exploded from The Sun Last Week

NASA is reporting that there were 2 Coronal Mass Ejection’s of our Sun in the last week, based on observations from NASA’s Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), and the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO).

On January 23, 2013 at roughly 9:55 AM EST, a Coronal Mass Ejection was expelled the Earth’s Sun, at speeds approaching 400 mi./s. The image was captured by NASA’s Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory. This CME was not directed towards the Earth.

The first of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on Jan. 23, 2013, can be seen erupting in the lower left portion of this image, from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. This CME was not Earth-directed. This image is what's known as a coronagraph, in which the bright light of the sun itself is blocked in order to better see the sun's atmosphere, the corona. Credit: ESA, NASA/SOHO

The first of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on Jan. 23, 2013, can be seen erupting in the lower left portion of this image, from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. This CME was not Earth-directed. This image is what’s known as a coronagraph, in which the bright light of the sun itself is blocked in order to better see the sun’s atmosphere, the corona.
Credit: ESA, NASA/SOHO

The ESA/NASA combined project, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured the 2nd of 2 Coronal Mass Ejection’s of the day. This CME was directed towards the Earth.

 The second of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on Jan. 23, 2013, is seen erupting in the top of the picture, away from the sun, which is obscured by the disk in the center. The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory captured this image, called a coronagraph: the bright light of the sun itself is blocked to provide a better view of the sun's atmosphere, the corona. This CME left the sun at speeds of 375 miles per second (1.35 million mph), which is almost 10 times lower than the very fastest CMEs. Credit: ESA, NASA/SOHO


The second of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on Jan. 23, 2013, is seen erupting in the top of the picture, away from the sun, which is obscured by the disk in the center. The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory captured this image, called a coronagraph: the bright light of the sun itself is blocked to provide a better view of the sun’s atmosphere, the corona. This CME left the sun at speeds of 375 miles per second (1.35 million mph), which is almost 10 times lower than the very fastest CMEs.
Credit: ESA, NASA/SOHO

A Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is categorized as a massive burst of solar wind along with magnetic fields that rise above the solar corona, while being released into space.

CME’s have been linked with other types of solar activity such as solar flares, but no correlation between the 2 has ever been confirmed.

When a Coronal Mass Ejection is directed towards the Earth, an anomaly of space weather may occur that is described as a Geo-Magnetic Storm.

A geomagnetic storm is created by the solar wind is shockwave and the magnetic field created by a Coronal Mass Ejection. This geomagnetic storm can affect the Earth’s magnetic field, which is referred to as a magnetosphere.

The outward most atmosphere of the sun is called the Corona, the structure of which is an extremely strong magnetic field. Fields of sunspots on the sun are often closed over, and when the confined solar atmosphere in these sunspots erupts, a sudden and violent release of particles combined with gas and magnetic fields create a Coronal Mass Ejection. Billions of tons of solar particles then surge outward from the surface of the sun, at speeds approaching 1.5 million MPH.

This occasionally creates auroras in the North and South Pole regions of the earth, which may or may not affect electrical and satellite communication systems here on earth, depending on the intensity of the CME.

Jim Donahue

Sources / Links / References

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/news/News012313-cme.html

http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronal_mass_ejection

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geomagnetic_storm

5 Responses to NASA: 2 Coronal Mass Ejections’ Exploded from The Sun Last Week

  1. Dewey Sayenoff February 2, 2013 at 9:47 pm

    Guys, journalists are HUMAN, too. They make mistakes. I’m guessing those of you who criticize NEVER make mistakes?

    Praytell, what is it like to be God? Oh, wait, He makes mistakes too… So I guess the question is, “What’s it like to be BETTER than God?”

    Reply
  2. GM February 2, 2013 at 8:47 am

    Yes Burr, we do proof-read, but we are not perfect, just busy as hell.

    Reply
  3. Gabe Romero February 1, 2013 at 5:29 pm

    I like reading future articles damn u guys sure r advanced wow I’m a believer haha sarcastically making a comment on ignorance

    Reply
  4. Keiki February 1, 2013 at 11:03 am

    “On June 23, 2013 at roughly” I think there’s a typo….

    Reply
  5. Burr February 1, 2013 at 11:02 am

    Jesus christ do you guys ever even proof read anymore? june 23, 2013? Wtf happened to journalism…

    Reply

Your Thoughts?

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Quantcast