16-year-old and 7-month-old Missing


Missing 16-year-old and 7-month-old have cross OhioMissing Shaina Nicole Tenney 16-year-old and Grace Hope Tenney 7-month-old West Virginia girls and their alleged 57-year-old abductor have crossed into Ohio Tuesday night. The Amber Alert issued for two West Virginia girls has been extended to Ohio, according to the website of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

The NCMEC website further states in the updated Amber Alert that the suspect, Margel F. Tenney, is being investigated for sexual abuse against the teen. Grace is described as a white female, about 2-foot-4, weighing Missing 16-year-old and 7-month-old have cross Ohio19 pounds. She has black hair and blue eyes. Shaina is described as a white female, about 5-foot-2, 225 pounds with black hair and hazel eyes. She was last seen wearing black stretch pants, a grey shirt, white tennis shoes and a black or grey hoodie.

There is conflicting information on the NCMEC website regarding the color of the vehicle in question. The Ohio Amber Alert lists the suspect vehicle as a red Ford Taurus, while the previously issued West Virginia Amber Alert lists the vehicle color as beige.

The suspect is Margel F. Tenney. He is described as a 6-foot-8, 185-pound white male with blue eyes. He is believed to be driving a red 2003 Ford Taurus sedan with West Virginia license plate number 2LW179.
Previous reports indicated the suspect and victims might have been headed south to Texas. They may have been spotted crossing into Ohio at about 9 p.m. on Interstate 77, according to an Amber Alert statement issued to the media.

Anyone who spots the suspect, vehicle, or children should call 1-877-AMBER-OH (262-3764) or dial 9-1-1.Missing 16-year-old and 7-month-old have cross Ohio

The AMBER Alert Program is a voluntary partnership between law-enforcement agencies, broadcasters, transportation agencies, and the wireless industry, to activate an urgent bulletin in the most serious child-abduction cases. The goal of an AMBER Alert is to instantly galvanize the entire community to assist in the search for and the safe recovery of the child.
AMBER Alerts are broadcast through radio, television, road signs and all available technology referred to as the AMBER Alert Secondary Distribution Program. These broadcasts let law enforcement use the eyes and ears of the public to help quickly locate an abducted child. The U.S. Department of Justice coordinates the AMBER Alert program on a national basis.
The AMBER Alert Program was named in honor of 9-year-old Amber Hagerman who was abducted while riding her bicycle in Arlington, Texas, and was later found murdered. The program is used in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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