More than 70 murdered journalist and 13 missing in Mexico


More than 70 murdered and 13 journalist in Mexico

Mexico is one of the countries where journalists “face the most danger” from criminal organizations, resulting in the murders and disappearances of many members of the media, the president and CEO of the Mexico City daily El Universal, Juan Francisco Ealy, said Monday. More than 70 journalists have been murdered and 13 others have gone missing in Mexico,

Armando Rodriguez’s mother burst into tears at the impunity of point-blank murder of a reporter for El Diario, who on November 13 2008 gave 13 shots in front of his daughter

The camera filming at close angle to define the face, the mouth of which leaves a particular description of injustice, “I always feel that something is missing.”

The organization of journalists Article 19 yesterday they presented this documentary by journalist preamble Juárez, as a revealing report that breaks myths about the profile of the perpetrators of the press are authorities, organized crime is not the main suspects-and reproaches the Mexican Government attention “makeup” to 72 murders and 15 disappearances since 2006.

In the last year, 2012 totaled 207 attacks on journalists, media workers and media facilities in 25 states, including seven murders and two disappearances. This is 20.3% higher than that recorded by Article 19 the previous year, 35 cases.

“It is the face of impunity which leaves journalists increasingly vulnerable,” said Diego Osorno, editor of the Leopard in Mexico and a member of the organization who titled his report “double murder” in reference to the crime and indifference to clarify it.

Two years before the death of Rodriguez, the editor of Michoacan newspaper Eco Tepalcatepec Basin, José Antonio García Apac, disappeared in the middle of a discussion with strangers in the region. They made him get off the truck while his son listened to everything from the phone.

Relatives reported to local authorities, they sent the case to the Attorney General’s Office (PGR) and federal prosecutors finally decided to send the case “subject” which currently rusts.

Similar fate has research folder Armando Rodriguez. In the documentary inspired by his case, shows a group of friends and close colleagues frustrated because the victim was never interviewed as part of the investigation police incriminating linked to organized crime.

The perception that only criminal groups seek to silence journalists-a hypothesis that drove the government of Felipe Calderón (2006-2102) – is today one of the major concerns of Article 19.
“It is a fragmented version that minimizes the risks.”

According to the report, were authorities of the three levels of government, especially local and state police, those responsible for 43.6% of the attacks on freedom of expression in 2012, almost three times more than those attributed to organized crime (14 %) or undetermined causes (15%).

Special theme is the Northeast, where the role of cartels to silence the media is effective. In Tamaulipas years no specific threats to the media, bulk purchases, capture of grenades and attacks on facilities: in 2012 threw grenades against five local newspapers and two branches of Televisa.

Gradually many newspapers in the region silenced their information on organized crime related violence until none of the major newspapers carried headlines such important events as the arrest of Eduardo Sanches Costilla, leader of the Gulf Cartel, and Heriberto Lazcano’s death , leader of the Zetas.

Luisa Ortiz, campaign director of the organization Change, believes that the Government of Enrique Peña Nieto could reduce attacks on journalists if they get the Special Prosecutor for Attention to Crimes Against Freedom of Expression count with a legal framework to enforce its remedies, a larger budget and autonomy.

Media members must also contend with long-running abuse at the hands of federal, state and local officials.

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