QB Steve Davis dies in plane crashed

 QB Steve Davis dies in plane crashed A former University of Oklahoma football star and another man were killed when their plane crashed into a house in Indiana.

Davis, 60-years-old, and Caves, 58-years-old, died; Davis’ parents, Jim and Patsy Davis, of Sallisaw, Okla., confirmed his death. Three others were injured, including two passengers.

The plane was attempting to circle back around to the city’s regional airport after a failed landing attempt when it crashed along Iowa Street.

He was an experiencing problem with the technical equipment, he said.
The plane was almost on its back and was “spiraling down,” resident Theresa Futa told WNDU.

“I’ve never seen anything like that before in my life ever.”

Fox said he had minimal information about the pilots, but said both had pilots’ certificates and both had multiengine aircraft certificates, he said. The voice-box recorder was recovered and is being sent to Washington, D.C., for investigation, Fox said.

A representative of the National Transportation Safety Board arrived late Sunday to investigate the crash.

The neighborhood of about 50 homes is under mandatory evacuation until at least 7 a.m. local time, officials said. Utilities were shut off as a precaution over concerns of a possible gas leak in the area.
Caves owned the Beechcraft Premier I twin-jet. It was not immediately clear if he was at the controls when it crashed. Patsy Davis said she believed it was possible her son would have been in the co-pilot’s seat.

“He hadn’t flown for a while, but as far as we know, he was still a licensed pilot. He didn’t own a plane,” she said Monday.
Deron Spoo, pastor at First Baptist Church in Tulsa, where Davis went to church, said, “He absolutely loved getting in the air.”
The plane left Tulsa, Oklahoma on Sunday afternoon, and was scheduled to land at South Bend Regional Airport about 80 minutes later at 4:20 p.m. ET, WNDU reported.
The troubled aircraft startled Shelby Ramirez, who was driving in the area.

“I happened to see the shadow and I said ‘Oh my God. I’ve never seen a plane that low,'” Ramirez said. “And I would say if it was 3 feet above the top of the car it was something. It could have dropped on us.”
Frank Sojka, 84, who lives in the first home that was struck, went back to the neighborhood Monday morning to tell police what items he wanted retrieved. A total of eight homes remain under mandatory evacuation.

“I’m surprised people survived that,” he said as he sat in his car with his son, waiting for police to move the barricade on his street.
Sojka said he was in the front bedroom of the home in which he has lived for 55 years when he heard a loud, dull sound.

“I got up and went into the living room, and I could see the sky through the ceiling and all kinds of debris in the far end of the living room,” he said.
The neighborhood of about 50 homes is under mandatory evacuation until at least 7 a.m. local time, officials said. Utilities were shut off as a precaution over concerns of a possible gas leak in the area.

Two shelters have been set up to house residents.

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