Taco Bell new nutritious menu by 2020


Taco Bell to offer more nutritious menu by 2020
By Dawn Cranfield

Taco Bell to offer more nutritious menu by 2020

Fast food giant Taco Bell has officially “jumped the shark”; they have joined in with other on-the-go eateries in trying to sell the public on the idea of fast, cheap, but still nutritious.  While the Mexican favorite is not rushing to update their cheesy, spicy, gooey menu, they hope their lower sodium, less fat, but still inexpensive fare will be a hit with the public in 2020.

Taco Bell has already reduced the sodium content of their food by 20% over the past few years.  However, that is not enough, according to legislatures and Taco Bell executives; they say younger eaters are making healthier choices when it comes to food and the chain is reacting.

The chain is planning to revamp 20% of their combo meals so they will meet the dietary guidelines of one-third of the federal government’s recommended dietary guideline.  Thus, one meal would be equal to one-third of the requirements for an average three-meal day.

Legislators, activists, and parents are insisting restaurants and fast-food establishments be held responsible for what they serve and urging them to offer more low fat, lower sodium food as their standard fare.  Think of all of the lawsuits where people have sued McDonalds because they were overweight and they blamed the hamburger chain.  What?

According to Greg Creed, CEO of Taco Bell, “Our customer tastes and needs are evolving.  They want more balanced options.”  (usatoday.com)

Creed is correct, customer tastes and needs do evolve, but places like Taco Bell are not usually the venue those with the most evolved tastes seek out.  Untitled2When a commercial for a taco, burrito, or chalupa comes on late night television and you thinking about running for the border, the last thing you think about is nutrition.

Most people conjure up images of digging the change out of their ashtray, the funny sayings on the hot sauce packets (“At night the sporks pick on me”), 6-packs of tacos, or if their local Taco Bell is open 24-hours; they usually do not worry about the sodium or fat content, whether or not their parents are going to approve of their dietary choices, or if the legislature has had a hand in the menu.  It should stay that way.

If you want a salad, fruit, or an otherwise healthy choice, there are always options such as staying at home and making a meal there, selecting a different restaurant entirely, or even altering the menu items already available, such as no cheese or sour cream.  The government and bullying mobs of people do not always have to get involved in big business and tell them how to determine what to sell and how to sell it.

One nutritionist, Robyn Flipse, is unimpressed by the proposed changes at Taco Bell, “Does anyone actually go to Taco Bell who is worried about calories or sodium? I think their target is looking for something that is convenient, low-cost and fills them up. I just don’t see anything that supports that people to Taco Bell wishing it was a little healthier.”  (usatoday.com)

I concur.  If I want healthy, I stay home and make something myself, selecting my own ingredients; I know everything I put in to each dish, and I know exactly what I am eating.

However, when I want something cheesy, gooey, spicy, and tastes great for next to nothing, I make a run for the border.  I do not want anybody to tell me I don’t have the option to select what I want from the menu.

In June 2011, MyPlate replaced MyPyramid as the government's primary food group symbol. MyPlate is an easy-to-understand visual cue to help consumers adopt healthy eating habits by encouraging them to build a healthy plate, consistent with the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
In June 2011, MyPlate replaced MyPyramid as the government’s primary food group symbol. MyPlate is an easy-to-understand visual cue to help consumers adopt healthy eating habits by encouraging them to build a healthy plate, consistent with the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

If we keep heading down the same path, we will have one super restaurant with all the same fare in order to satisfy every legislator, parent, activist and person who complained: McBurgerTacoPizzaSubJoint – Where everything is low in sodium, low in fat, tastes like cardboard… but wait, there is one great thing about it, it is high in cost, just to keep the government happy.

USA Today Article

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.