Taksim Square II and the Topless Protestor

 

TURKEY-GOVERNMENT-PARLIAMENTReuters is reporting that security forces fired teargas, and used water cannons to drive off protesters from a park in Istanbul.  Is this the beginning of Taksim Square II?  And what about the ‘topless protestor?’

“I can’t allow a demonstration that I haven’t permitted in advance.”  These were the words of Istanbul Governor Hüseyin Avni Mutlu.

What began in May as a sit-in to prevent the destruction of Gezi Park, turned into an anti-government protest.  The people of Turkey have similar complaints as did the people of Egypt.  Prime Minister Erdogan has autocratically decided to institute a strict Islamic regime, without asking the permission of Turkey’s citizens.  Leaders of the world’s nations have forgotten that their countries are made up of people, not geographical boundaries, and they are there to serve those same people, not vice versa.

The Taksim Solidarity Platform, which encompasses a vast collective of political groups, organized the march, calling for protesters to try and gain access to the park, according to Reuters’ witness reports. Istanbul’s governor had responded saying that any attempt to do so would be met with a police response.

“The Constitution says that anyone can stage a demonstration without giving notification, but the legislation says that applying to the authorities for permission is mandatory. So nobody can say they exercise their constitutional rights. This is unlawful,” Gov. Hüseyin Avni Mutlu had told reporters in response to news of the protest.

At least one child was injured by the teargas canisters.

Troops hounded the protesters back into the side streets in what bystanders labeled the biggest police intervention since mid-June. Several people were detained by police, according to Reuters.

‘Femen’ is the name of the Turkish feminist movement, and is at the center of the protests.  Only one woman protested at the Sabiha Gokcen airport in Istanbul but Femen issued a statement.

“Femen urges the people of Turkey, like Egyptians, to overthrow Erdogan’s Islamist regime and force Erdogan to relocate to a country close to him in spirit (for example): Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan.”

The woman who protested against Prime Minister Erdogan was topless, and wore only a miniskirt and high heels.  Across her chest, in red, was “Air Dictator,” and she held a mock plane ticket which read “Erdogan, from: Istanbul to: Kabul.”

Although she was standing on the Asian side of the airport, she was arrested.

Sharia law, proposed by Morsi and Erdogan, is religious law, not civil.  The most severe elements relate to women.  According to sharia law, “women should lower their gaze and guard their modesty that they should not display their beauty and ornaments except what (must ordinarily) appear thereof; that they should draw their veils over their bosoms and not display their beauty except to their husbands, their fathers, their husband’s fathers, their sons, their husbands’ sons, their brothers or their brothers’ sons, or their sisters’ sons, or their women, or the slaves whom their right hands possess, or male servants free of physical needs, or small children who have no sense of the shame of sex; and that they should not strike their feet in order to draw attention to their hidden ornaments.”

Western clothing, make-up, or any display of femininity is forbidden.  Subservience to their male counterparts is mandatory.

A thousand years ago, women were raised to accept these conditions.  Welcome to the 21st century; television, the internet, and movies.  Male dominance is being lowered into a grave.

What began in early May is not over in early July.  Is this Taksim Square II, and what about the courageous woman who went topless and shamed Erdogan?

Alfred James reporting

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2 Responses to "Taksim Square II and the Topless Protestor"

  1. gilson chapple   July 6, 2013 at 4:24 pm

    Religion and superstition go hand in hand to ruin freedom of expression.

    Reply

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