AR-15 Kills Owner and His Son

1280px-US_Navy_070501-N-3901L-085_Chief_Gunner^rsquo,s_Mate_Don_Christenson,_of_Naval_Reserve_Navy_Operational_Support_Center_Las_Vegas,_fires_his_AR-15_rifle

Sensible people are adamant that assault rifles are weapons which should be in the hands of the military and law enforcement exclusively.  A sad story comes out of Tennessee that caused the owner of an AR-15 and his 12-year-old son to lose their lives.

A father, who was apparently showing a family friend his assault rifle, experienced an accidental discharge of the rifle.  A small fire ensued, followed by multiple explosions.

The accident happened in Huron, Tennessee on Sunday.  The father, Terry York, 48, and 12-year-old son died from carbon monoxide inhalation and thermal burns.  They were in a back room of their wooden mobile.

Henderson County Sheriff Brian Duke said:  “It was a bizarre misfire that I hadn’t seen for more than 20 years.”

A neighbor said it started out as a small fire, but continuous explosions caused the back of the home to be engulfed in flames.  Henderson County Fire Chief Lynn Murphy said it took firefighters more than four hours to extinguish the blaze.  Although the back of the mobile was completely destroyed, the rest remained virtually undamaged.

Duke said the 12-year-old boy had attempted to douse the flames.  York died at the scene, and his son died en route to a hospital.

Kate Abernathy, who is an investigator for the state’s bomb and arson division, said there was ‘black powder’ found at the scene.  The agency believes it was used to reload cartridges, but an investigation is continuing.

One other unnamed family member was injured attempting to enter the back room.  Firefighters and other responders did not suffer any injuries.

James Turnage Reporting

source

One Response to "AR-15 Kills Owner and His Son"

  1. Milton Ruiz   August 21, 2013 at 9:11 pm

    I would just like to say that if black powder or pyrodex was involved in this incident, those particular propellants are much more volatile than the smokeless powder in modern rifle cartridges, and black powder in particular, is more sensitive to shock, heat, flame, or even static electricity than I care for. I really don’t think the modern rifles were the problem in this case.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.