NASA Plans Asteroid Hunt [Video]

Asteroid Wallpaper

NASA has unveiled details pertaining to a new mission to locate, redirect and capture an asteroid in close orbit with Earth, using the Orion spacecraft. In addition, as part of its proposed asteroid hunt, the agency plans to obtain samples, using human spacewalk runs, in hopes that sample analysis may yield some greater understanding of our galaxy.

According to NASA, they are attempting to capture near-Earth asteroids as a part of their Asteroid Redirect Mission, to research and classify them in much greater detail. This could help identify potentially harmful asteroids; these coordinated efforts could then be used to target and impede their orbit.

During their concept video, NASA attempts to explain the intricacies of their ambitious Redirect project. They depict a captured asteroid, in orbit around the moon, to be targeted and investigated. A manned space shuttle, called Orion, will then begin its nine-day journey to the asteroid and use lunar gravity assist to swing by the moon, towards their ultimate destination.

Essentially, the asteroid will be held in a “capture bag,” and then presented to incoming astronauts in an orbit around the moon; its position will be guaranteed using ion thrusters.

NASA Asteroid Concept Art

Once Orion has spiraled around the moon and begins honing in on the already-imprisoned asteroid, the astronauts dock with a robotic capture vehicle, affixed to the helpless asteroid, and prepare for their space walk. After shuffling along the perimeter of the asteroid, the space explorers will inspect the asteroid and obtain a series of samples, ready for thorough inspection.

Content with their work, the team of astronauts will disembark from the robotic capture vehicle and begin to make a ten-day return journey, again, harnessing the gravitational forces of the moon to jettison them back to Earth.

NASA Asteroid Capture Concept Art

The implications of asteroid capture are quite significant. These protocols, if successful, could provide a viable planetary defense method, prohibiting hazardous asteroids on a direct collision course for Earth. Aside from this, such a technique could signal the first of many asteroid captures for the benefit of asteroid mining.

However, aside from their plans in asteroid hunting, NASA is also preparing a similar program, which looks set to take asteroid mining to an entirely new level. At the tail end of 2018, NASA plans to dispatch an unmanned, yet highly sophisticated, spacecraft (OSIRIS-REX) to an asteroid called Bennu. Upon arrival, OSIRIS-REX will scan the asteroid using a series of spectrometers and will then commence collection of deep-surface samples, before returning. It’s thought that asteroids could yield an abundant source of materials, including precious metals, fertilizer components, as well as nickel, magnesium and iron. What’s more, C-type asteroids may also yield substantial banks of water, which could be utilized during space travel for rehydration and a source of breathable oxygen.

In addition, the propulsion technology required for such endeavors could eventually improve NASA’s chances of visiting Mars. However, this may be slightly redundant, as a Dutch-based corporation is already planning their Mars One campaign, which looks set to deliver human colonies to Mars, by as early as 2023.

Alas, there are always unfortunate political hurdles that must be overcome. According to NASA’s website, the plans come in the wake of President Obama’s appeal for a 2014 fiscal year budget from the world-renowned space agency. However, a Republican-based subcommittee on all-matters space has elected to try and cap NASA’s future budget at five percent less than the previous year.

According to The Register, congress wishes to assume control over the space agency’s selection of administrator. Worryingly, when reviewing the bill associated with such regulation, the chairman for the Committee on Science Space and Technology, Lamar Smith, had this to say:

“Today, a question exists about NASA’s vision, namely, whether there is one.”

This was then followed by a discussion of the NASA Authorization Act of 2013, which stipulates that NASA will be forced to pursue expeditions to the surface of both the Moon and Mars, whilst ditching their planned asteroid-retrieval mission:

“The administrator shall not fund the development of an asteroid retrieval mission…”

The act is certainly not set in stone, however, and an official of the Obama administration has since defined the proposed legislation as a “non-starter.” Let’s just hope that NASA’s planned asteroid hunt isn’t doomed by the meddling political powers that be.

By: James Fenner

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7 Responses to NASA Plans Asteroid Hunt [Video]

  1. Jarvis August 27, 2013 at 10:59 pm

    Fail. if you hit with a nuke it will break into smaller fragments. Otherwise the weight created by kinetic energy generated at impact will not slow down the one I saw.

    Reply
  2. Ben Welgoed August 27, 2013 at 8:04 am

    To JF who states: “these asteroids are an ideal target for mining”. Anything worth the time and money to mine an asteroid must be VERY high in value, which might be in the case of the rarest of Rare Earth metals. However, 1) You’d need to know ahead of time what the ‘rock’ is made of; 2) the cost alone of setting up sufficient power to do the job would be enormous, then add the landing on Earth cost.

    The whole asteroid capture seems to only make sense as an Earth-impact-prevention measure, and then again only if the asteroid is large enough to cause a major impact. That in turn will call for an even bigger mission to alter the course of such an asteroid. That quickly sounds like mission ballooning.

    Reply
    • James Fenner August 27, 2013 at 3:51 pm

      Hi Ben. Thanks for commenting. Certainly agree with you on that point. As things stand, asteroid mining is not a viable solution, due to obvious issues with expense. I’ve been informed that, once the technology is perfected and costs come down, it should become possible eventually. How far in the future, I’m not sure.

      Reply
  3. KY August 27, 2013 at 8:04 am

    Some meteorites are almost pure IRON……KY IS THE ROCKETMAN FIRST TO PUT A PRIVATE PROJECTILE IN SPACE. WE ARE GOING TO CAPTURE ONE MADE OF IRON AND SELL IT TO THE MINING INDUSTRY OF NORTHERN MINNESOTA TO BUILD TRAINS, SHIPS, CARS ETC. WE WILL LAND THE METEORITE IN LAKE SUPERIOR. ANYONE WANT TO BUY A METEOR MADE OF IRON?

    Reply
  4. Loco Bane August 27, 2013 at 6:19 am

    Awesome. I am glad they developing technologies to save us from an asteroid. I think there is one we have to worry about in the next couple of decades. Hope fully with other asteroid samples we will know for sure what they are made of so we can develope a weapon that will disintegrate that type of material.

    Reply
    • James Fenner August 27, 2013 at 6:27 am

      Hi Loco. Thanks for taking the time to comment. I completely agree. I really hope it does get the go ahead, as it could yield brand new tech that could be applicable to other space endeavors and for ensuring our planets continued safety. Also, with resources running low on Earth, these asteroids are an ideal target for mining. I’m constantly amazed by NASA’s plans, but just hope the government doesn’t interfere too much! James.

      Reply

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