Kate Middleton and William to Christen Prince George – Royal Mint Issues Commemorative Coins

Prince George with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge
Royal Baby with Kate Middleton and Prince William

Kate Middleton and Prince William are taking baby Prince George to the Chapel Royal for his christening, and the Royal Mint is issuing special commemorative coins to mark the occasion. This is the first time that the Royal Mint has ever issued new coins to mark a christening in the entire history of the Royal Family, and since the event will be a private ceremony it is expected that Royal fans will scoop up the official coins as a way of celebrating at home.

Unlike his son, Prince William was christened at home in Buckingham Palace on the very day of his great-grandmother’s birth – August 4th, 1982. William was baptized by then Archbishop of Canterbury, Robert Runcie, and Prince George will have the ceremony performed by current Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Whelby. The British Royal family are all members of the Church of England, which was established by their ancestor King Henry VIII in the 16th century.

Prince George's baptism marked with special coin
Royal Mint issues commemorative coin for Prince George

The happy new Royal parents announced on their public webpage that Prince George’s christening is scheduled to take place on October 23rd at The Chapel Royal in St. James’s Place, London. Only members of the Royal family are expected to attend, as well as the as-yet unnamed godparents of baby George. The Palace Royal was the place where young Prince William, Prince Harry and other members of the Royal family paid their last respects to boys’ mother, Princess Diana, in 1997.

Kate Middleton and her royal husband, Prince William, were gracious in allowing photographs to be taken as they exited the hospital following the birth of their first child, however no press photos of the baby have been taken since. To appease the press and the public, Kate and William have stated that photos of the christening ceremony will be released following the event, however no public photographers or members of the press will be allowed inside the Palace Royal. As 3rd in line to the British Royal Crown, Prince George’s christening is the Royal Family’s way of having him officially enter the Church of England, which will be under the boy’s leadership when he is King.

The production of the Royal Mint’s baptism commemorative coins has been approved by Kate Middleton, Prince William and by no means least, her majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Although the design has not yet been released, the Royal Mint reports that the coins will be available in various materials: gold, silver, platinum, and an as-yet undecided, more affordable material. The coins will have a face value of 5 pounds, which converts to just over US $8.07, but the precious-metal versions are set to sell for several thousand dollars per piece. The lowest-value coin from the “Royal Baby” collection is priced at 13 pounds, or just under US $21. Collectors of Royal memorabilia can pre-order these special coins now from the Royal Mint as stock is expected to sell out quickly.

by Mandy Gardner

DukeandDuchessofCambridge.com

Yahoo! News

Royal Mint

3 Responses to "Kate Middleton and William to Christen Prince George – Royal Mint Issues Commemorative Coins"

  1. Guest USA   September 29, 2013 at 7:18 pm

    Her name is Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge or William and Catherine, or Duchess Catherine informally. I don’t know who this other person is that you’re referring to. A married royal with a title does not have a last name or maiden name or surname. This is causing so much confusion. Readers and Catherine, I’m sure, don’t like to be bullied

    Reply
    • Mandy Gardner   September 30, 2013 at 10:00 am

      We do realize that her name is Catherine and that her marital status to Prince William takes away her maiden name of Middleton. Since many of her fans still think of her as “Kate Middleton”, however, the monicker has stuck.

      Reply

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