HPV, FDA, CDC and Merck Controversy

HPVThe Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Merck (manufacturer of Gardasil) are questioning the validity of findings stating that ill effects are associated with Gardasil, the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, according to a CBS report. HPV is the most common sexually-transmitted infection, according to the CDC. Merck claims the vaccine remains safe and effective and that its benefits outweigh the risks. It is confident enough in the effectiveness of Gardasil to request FDA approval for giving the drug to boys also. This is intended to more effectively protect girls from infection.

The CBS News investigation revealed that since 2003 the FDA has been aware that HPV does not always cause cancer and it is often self-clearing. The FDA website states, “There is no cure for the virus (HPV) itself. There are treatments for the health problems that HPV can cause, such as genital warts, cervical changes, and cervical cancer. There are many treatment choices for genital warts. But even after the warts are treated, the virus might still be there and may be passed on to others. If genital warts are not treated they may go away, stay the same, or increase in size or number, but they will not turn into cancer.”

The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCLS) states that HPV causes practically every case of genital warts and cervical cancer. In addition, they estimate that 20 million people in the U.S. get infected with 6.2 million cases added each year. They report there is no cure for the virus and there are more than 30 strains of HPV. Accordingly, 10,000 women are diagnosed each year with cervical cancer and 3,700 die from it. NCLS also states that most of the strains of HPV disappear on their own and do not produce any symptoms.

There are two FDA-approved HPV vaccines:  Merck’s Gardasil–for strains 6, 11 and 18–and GlaxoSmithKline’s Cervarix, for strains 16 and 18. The four strains have been linked to causing about 70 percent of cervical cancer cases and 90 percent of genital wart cases. As a result, it has been recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) to immunize girls between the ages of 11 and 12 with the vaccines. The intention is to protect this population before they become sexually active. There are also various recommendations by the ACIP to vaccinate males between the ages of 11 through 26. The ability to implement such recommendations is a state-by-state decision.

Dr. Diane Harper, professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, says of every single woman who gets HPV, approximately 70 percent of them will heal naturally within the first year, this occurring without doing anything at all to assist the process.  The body has the innate ability to activate the healing, she says.  She continues, stating that within two years, at least 90 percent of the infections will clear; again this is a natural self-healing process.  Within three years, of the 10 percent left, half of them will develop a CIN2/3 lesion, otherwise known as a precancerous lesion.  This means that 5 percent of 100 will develop a precancerous lesion.  Consequently, a more severe case with CIN3 lesions takes about five years for 20 percent of them to become invasive carcinomas. It takes about 30 years for 40 percent of them to become invasive cervical carcinomas.

Dr. Lucija Tomlijenovic from the University of British Columbia in Canada states that many girls who have taken the HPV vaccine Gardasil have come down with cases of multiple sclerosis and encephalitis or brain inflammation. These studies are from researchers who were not sponsored by the vaccine manufacturers.  Tomlijenovic says if one were to pay attention to the manufacturer’s reports it would be noted results are not constructed to report any serious adverse effects.

Studies sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline for the HPV vaccine Cervarix were not designed to detect autoimmune diseases, according to Tomlijenovic. As a result, the studies have concluded that there is no association between Cervarix and the increased risk of autoimmune diseases.  This statement comes across as being true since there is no proof it is false.

Dr. Jennifer Ashton, correspondent for the CBS Early Show, reported about an athlete named Amanda falling ill just three weeks after receiving the HPV vaccine. Amanda now has an autoimmune disease.  The cause is unknown, though her doctors and parents believe the vaccine is the culprit. Another girl, nine-year-old Constance, was an athlete considered to be gifted and talented; her declining health pattern began a week after receiving the vaccination. After side effects kept her in the hospital for three months, she was no longer a gifted child or an athlete.  She had to learn how to walk again and needs a wheelchair. Thirteen-year-old Zada was an honor student.  She had a seizure 14 days after receiving the vaccine.  She now can not walk, speak or eat. In another case, the Mayo Clinic found teenager Hope to have experienced a “possible adverse reaction to Gardasil vaccine.”  According to the CBS report, many girls report symptoms of Guillian-Barre Syndrome (GBS) after receiving Gardasil In addition, many girls report having seizures, muscle weakness and permanent disability.

There have been at least 32 cases of death that appear to be connected to the vaccine. Gynecologist Dr. Jacques Moritz of New York’s St. Luke’s Roosevelt Hospital told ABC News he will not vaccinate his 11 year old daughter until evidences proves its effectiveness. He believes pap smears are effective preventive measures.

By Dada Ra

Sources:

NPR

CDC

NCLS

FDA

HPV Dangers Video

Dr. Lucija Tomlijenovic Video

Dr. Diane Harper Video

7 Responses to "HPV, FDA, CDC and Merck Controversy"

  1. Tim Tahaney   October 29, 2014 at 11:24 am

    Katherine – if you have suffered reactions from merck’s gardasil vaccine that caused your health problems you can and should seek compensation , Merck does not need to admit
    Responsibility. Prior to FDA approving gardasil clinical test were done on 21000 Americans, adverse effects were documented. In 2009 the Jama studied gardasil reactions that had occurred for the two years after it’s approval by the FDA. The study lists side effects from this vaccine, if you have experienced any of these known effects then no reason you can’t go after Merck…

    Reply
  2. Katherine   February 3, 2014 at 1:46 pm

    I was a victim! I am a victim! I received it at age nine and to this day I continue to suffer. I have been to several specialists regarding my bones, stomach, intestines, muscles, vascular system, and mental health. Never did I have any of these problems before I received gardisil. My medical bills are racking up, and I cannot even take legal action against Merck because they will not admit their product is hurting people, it’s killing people! Please don’t vaccinate your daughters, please don’t. This vaccine has completely ruined my life. I’m pending disability and have been since age seventeen. This is the worst thing I have ever encountered. Merck needs to admit their fault so we can be compensated and we can begin seeing doctors that will admit this is the cause of it. A lot of doctors won’t believe the type of injury sustained. They also don’t know how to help these adverse effects.

    Reply
  3. Jan McTiernan   January 21, 2014 at 2:36 am

    I am not surprised to hear about the HPV vaccine and its link to auto- immune diseases. Here in Australia there have been reported side effects from this vaccine such as Multiple Sclerosis; Lupus and a Glandular Fever like illness that is very debilitating and incurable too.
    I myself developed MS after being given the Hep. B vaccine twelve years ago. A number of other people I worked with at the time who were also given the Hep. B vaccine developed diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis; lupus ; psoaroasis; reiter’s syndrome and arthritis. It seems some vaccines trigger auto immune diseases. The drug companies do not want to know about it.

    Reply
  4. Dada Ra   January 16, 2014 at 11:57 am

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCA5haGU6sI&list=PL9377E5E1BA48F30D first line info is in this video. The article address more of the information not normally publicized.

    Reply
  5. Dan Kegel   January 14, 2014 at 8:04 am

    You didn’t include a link to the “CBS News investigation”. I looked, and found all sorts of articles at CBS news on the vaccine, but none that matched the first line of the article.

    This is the closest match:
    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/is-the-hpv-vaccine-safe/
    but it doesn’t mention Jennifer Ashton.
    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/clearing-up-hpv-myths/
    does involve Ashton, but it’s not an investigation.

    The article also fails to mention the relevant safety studies; see http://hpv.kegel.com/safety/ for links to some of them. The best one so far is an independent study of all 10 to 17 year old adolescent girls in Denmark and Sweden, between 1 October 2006 and 31 December 2010; it found no safety problems due to the vaccine.

    Reply
  6. D Kitch   January 10, 2014 at 1:11 pm

    Confused – the NCLS is not a medical or clinical body that can speak from expertise. They are a policy making body comprised primarily of legislators. The statement above “The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCLS) states that HPV causes practically every case of genital warts and cervical cancer …” should be retracted. Suppositions need to be called out as suppositions. facts need to be supported and cited from documented, demonstrable expertise.

    Reply
  7. Robert   January 9, 2014 at 9:10 am

    Merck is only focusing on its earnings its shows no responsibility for bit.ly/1hw9jCp

    Reply

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