Nintendo Gamers Reactions Announced

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Nintendo gamers who hoped that the Japanese company would translate household games Super Mario and Donkey Kong into mobile applications bluntly announced their reactions after president Satoru Iwata admitted guilt.

The gaming company’s record annual loss didn’t leave the company’s executive insensitive in the face of damage to the enterprise’s renown and remuneration, but his decision not to make Nintendo software available on smart devices brought harsh reactions from devoted  players. Although Iwata took full responsibility for the financial hit, mentioning that it is “my duty, more than anything else, is to revive our business momentum,” Nintendo gamers announced their reactions with regard to the Japanese company’s limited game selection and game analysts like Ace Securities’ Hideki Yasuda stood up to fans’ disapproval.

“Nintendo’s worse-than-expected performance is mainly due to a slump in the Wii U,” Yasuda said.

The game analyst also expressed the same concerns as Nintendo gamers, whose announced reactions walked hand in hand with the failure to offer attractive games. Yasuda points at Nintendo’s rivals, whose “strong demand for their consoles” eventually took the market away from the Japanese company.

The $44 billion global video games market is usually divided into three: Nintendo, Sony and Microsoft. However, the new PlayStation 4 and Xbox One won gamers’ hearts with a whole range of games and an open mind with regard to mobile. Nintendo is losing their gamers, who announced their harsh reactions toward Iwata’s refusal to license iconic brands like Super Mario for use in mobile applications. The fans boycott Nintendo’s lack of presence in the mobile world and turn to Sony and Microsoft for consoles. As a result, the Japanese company sold only 2.8 million units worldwide in nine months while gamers prefered to purchase 4.2 million PlayStation 4 consoles in two months after its release.

CEO Iwata Harsh Punishment for Record Loss

Nintendo’s earlier forecast for nine million consoles put CEO Iwata into the position to cut half of his paycheck and between 20 and 30 percent of the board of directors’, including the salary of Mario’s father, Shigeru Miyamoto. However, Japanese executives are known for their habit of taking pay cuts when they fail to meet financial expectations.

Although Iwata decided to buy back eight percent of the company’s shares in order to mitigate its fall,  Nintendo gamers announced their reactions, which walk hand in hand with Iwata’s refusal to offer mini-games on smartphone devices. Another reason why Nintendo purchases failed to reach the executive’s expectations is also offered by gamers, whose reactions were announced not necessarily in words, but in actions. While Sony and Microsoft cushioned their landing with millions of purchases in a few months after the consoles’ release, Nintendo’s lack of interest toward including games like “Grand Theft Auto V” and “Battlefield 4” on its newest unit convinced fans not to direct their money to the Japanese company.

Nintendo’s $210 million profit in its third quarter did not give Iwata hope. Instead, he announced upcoming decrease in the fourth quarter “due to seasonal factors” and believes that the cost of the total annual loss could revolve around $355 million.

Apart from the Wii U slow sales, Nintendo’s hand-held 3DS sold only 13.5 million units from an expected 18 million. Both analysts and Nintendo gamers announced the fact that their negative reactions with regard to the Japanese company are strongly related to Iwata’s refusal to enter the mobile world. Both the boost in smartphones and tablets and the popularity of Xbox One and PlayStation 4 have caused Nintendo’s sales to fail its board of directors’ expectations.

By Gabriela Motroc

Sources:
Business Insider 
TIME
BBC News
The Guardian
Polygon

2 Responses to "Nintendo Gamers Reactions Announced"

  1. Jay Rodman   February 1, 2014 at 7:55 pm

    Mobile games suck, they wish they could be nintendo, just look at angry birds and cut the rope. They are now on nintendo systems and concoles. They know that those are the big leauges. In the short run it might look like nintendo is hurting, and of course anyone who can type isg oing to join the bandwagon and bash nintendo, from trolls to anyone who believes they qualify as a writer. In the long run Nintendo will sell systems and games apple will subtly copy them, and the next big thing is gonna knock mobile gaming off its high pedastol. People are fickle, something new will come along and the cycle will repeat. I don’t believe video games will die or are doomed. They make high quality. Products that blow mobile gaming way out of the water.

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  2. Kaihaku   February 1, 2014 at 5:30 pm

    Please cite your sources. I’ve seen Nintendo gamers upset that the Wii U wasn’t more powerful, that Nintendo isn’t taking online multiplayer seriously, and even wishing that Nintendo would go third party on home consoles…but I haven’t seen any “devoted players” wishing that Nintendo would switch focus to developing for mobile devices. I’ve heard a lot of people who grew up playing Nintendo games but who no longer own Nintendo hardware, or any dedicated gaming hardware in general, wishing for such a transition, but that’s about it. “Devoted gamers” seem fine with purchasing hardware that’s designed for gaming, they just aren’t happy with the hardware or software that Nintendo’s provided with the Wii U. As for the 3DS, Nintendo’s sales estimates were ridiculously high but by every other measure it’s been a runaway success and was the best selling piece of dedicated gaming hardware for 2013 period – hardly a failure.

    Also, incidentally, Nintendo actually did announce that they are forming a team that will develop for mobile devices and that at this point nothing is off the table – that is, Iwata specifically stated that the team can develop mobile games using classic Nintendo characters if they decide that’s the appropriate course of action.

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