Small Animal Lives 1400 Years

Small Animal Lives 1400 Years

It is true that some animal species definitely are able to age more gracefully than others, but there are none that are perhaps able to do it any better in the animal world than the small freshwater polyps which are known as hydras. Back in 1998 there was a biologist who volunteered his opinion that the tentacle covered creatures, by constantly refurbishing their own cells, might be able to keep the aging process away basically for an indeterminate period of time, which seems to create a kind of organic immortality for the tiny animals.

In a study that was recently done on the Hydra magnipapillata, as the animal is known scientifically. They were only one of over a dozen different animals that were included in a study that showed the diversity of aging in creatures. Where the fertility in the female sex of human beings tops out earlier in life and then begins to taper off, and both then the male and female humans’ mortality both rises sharply as the aging process goes along, there are numerous organisms which have a development that goes along a different life time cycle path

One creature, the water flea, for example, experiences both rise and fall in cycles of fertility all through its span of life and also has a much more slow rise in mortality. However, out of all animals studies, the hydras end up taking the winning prize for the strangest cycle of life. The polyp’s mortality seems to stay very low for an unlimited period of time. This information was reported in the journal Nature. While being tested in a meticulous laboratory setting, the investigators assessed that five percent of the hydra population would most likely still be alive even after 1,400 years had passed.

So the truth is that some species are able to age better than others, but there really do not seem to be any that are able to do it any better than in the animal world than the small freshwater polyps which are known as hydras. In 1998 there was a biologist who volunteered his opinion that the tentacle covered creatures, by constantly refurbishing their own cells, might be able to keep the aging process away basically for an indeterminate period of time, which seems to create a kind of organic immortality for the tiny animals.

It has seemed to work for the Hydra magnipapillata because with the lab studies that has been done; the researchers think that about five percent of the hydra population is still surviving even after 1,400 years have passed by. With their very low mortality rate, if their cell structure is studied more closely, maybe scientists can make sense of just exactly how they are staying alive for so long. They know the small creatures are constantly refurbishing their own cells, and that helps keep the aging process away for a long time, and this is what seems to make a sort of biologic immortality for the small creatures. The hydras are living for over a thousand years.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

Tech News Now

News Whip

Scientific America

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