Martian Meteorite Proves There Was Water on Mars Says Scientists

Martian Meteorite Proves There Was Water on Mars Says Scientists

A Martian meteorite has proven there was water on Mars says scientists. So even though there are two rovers currently on the go on Mars, a mission to send samples of the Red Planet back to Earth is still many years away. The only Martian samples that are accessible to anyone here are one that have exploded from Mars by impacts and have lasted through space to end up reaching the Earth’s exterior. Such Red Planet meteorites are able to be tested by scientists and put under an enormous range of studies.

Newfangled evaluations of the Martian meteorite Yamato 000593 was able to show evidence of earlier water movement. The research study was led by Lauren White, who worked for of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She also had a team that came from the Johnson Space Center. A news release came from the space center and said that Y000593 was believed to have formed about 1.3 billion years ago as a flow of lava chilled down on the surface of the Red Planet. Over eleven million years ago, the region endured a very hard crash and Y000593 was sent out into space. The meteor tumbled down to Earth around 50,000 years ago and hit the continent of Antarctica. It was found on the Yamato Glacier back in the year 2000 by an Antarctic research expedition that came from Japan.

The Mars meteorite ended up being categorized as nakhlite. Y000593 was able to be distinguished from various other meteorites and rocks from Earth by the assembly of the atoms of oxygen inside its silicate minerals and also ensnared atmospheric vapors that could only have been from the Red Planet.

White and her group found two different types of features that strongly proposed there was both biotic action and also water motion in Y000593. The meteorite was saturated by numerous micro sized tunnels which displayed coiled, rolling shapes. Such outlines were consistent with the modification of textures inside earthly basaltic glasses, which were created from the collaboration of microorganisms with the cooling lava.

Y000593 also contained nanometer to micrometer size spherules that were rooted between the silicate and carbonate layers. The spherules were found to be significantly enhanced with carbon relative in size to the neighboring layers of iddingsite. That was a form of rock which was formed as basal is produced in the existence of liquid water. It was possible that such features were able to form by abiotic means but it was not likely. This was because as they were examined, they appeared to be very similar in both configuration and also consistency to biogenic features that were in samples that were found on Earth.

Such features were also found to be extremely similar to the characteristics of Nakhla, which was a Martian meteorite that was witnessed as it dropped to the Earth way back in 1911. It was gathered immediately after it hit the ground. This indicated that it was unlikely, although not impossible, that the possible biotic smidgens found on Y000593 were because of Earth impurities.

The newest findings were printed up in the February edition of the science journal Astrobiology.

There may be two rovers currently on the go on Mars, a mission to send samples of the Red Planet back to Earth is still many years away. The only Martian samples that are accessible to anyone here are one that have exploded from Mars by impacts and have lasted through space to end up reaching the Earth’s exterior.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

The Christian Science Monitor

The Space Reporter

Northern Voices Online

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