Medical Marijuana Might Ease Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis

Medical Marijuana Might Ease Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis

Medical marijuana pills and oral sprays that are made from cannabis might end up easing the symptoms caused by multiple sclerosis that cause daily life to be difficult for sufferers. However the majority of alternative drugs do little to lessen up the pain muscle stiffness that often comes with the disease, states new guidelines released from the American Academy of Neurology.

However the synthetic creations of the drug do not alter the course of the disease and could even have unpleasant side effects along with, warn medical experts from the academy. The panel there looked over more than 40 years of research that was done on alternative medical treatments for MS. Multiple sclerosis patients very often look for substitute therapies for help they have such few options for the incurable, painful and chronic condition which is caused  from the immune system mistakenly attacking the body’s own nerves.

The review of therapies discovered that there is little evidence these work. Trying to use bee sting therapy or focusing on a low-fat diet with high amounts of fish oil did not show to aid in getting rid of any symptoms, and bee stings could even cause possible fatal allergic responses Dr. Vijayshree Yadav, who works for Oregon University, and led the team doing the investigate work, stated that there was not even enough evidence at the present time to make any endorsements on smoking marijuana for multiple sclerosis patients.

Yet the experts did give support toward the oral spray and pills, which evidence has shown seems to ease MS patients’ pain, muscle rigidity and frequent urination.  Also, with smoking medical marijuana, there can be trouble with dizziness, seizures, depression, memory problems and thinking disorders. Since some individuals who suffer from multiple sclerosis are at a higher chance of developing depression and therefore could be a greater suicide risk, patients need to talk about both the safety and dangers of medical marijuana with their primary care physician.

Medical marijuana in a pill is legal to be used for treating appetite loss and nausea in cancer patients. An oral spray has been approved for treating MS symptoms in Europe but not the United States.

Multiple sclerosis affects nearly 2.5 million individuals all over the world and there are two kinds of drugs that are used to slow both the progression of the disease and also help reduce the number of relapses; however they do not alter the course of the disease. Because of this, it is believed that between 35 percent and 85 percent of MS sufferers turn to alternative treatment in order to help with symptoms, especially females, those who have higher educations and those who are suffering from poorer health. But the safety of the majority of these therapies is really not known, and is unregulated by the Food and Drug Administration.

Timothy Coetzee, who is a research official for the National MS Society, stated that the prospective of marijuana as becoming a treatment for MS symptoms is very important. He stated that he wanted to emphasize the approach in supporting the rights of people suffering from multiple sclerosis to be able to work with their private physicians and making sure they can do depending on the state they live in.

Coetzee explained that following specific guidelines are important because they help patients stay informed about approaches they can use to lessen symptoms. He added that it is very important to keep options open so that patients with MS are able to live lives the best way possible.

The guidelines were printed up in latest issue of the journal Neurology.

It has been found that medical marijuana pills and oral sprays which are made from cannabis might end up easing the symptoms caused by multiple sclerosis that cause daily life to be difficult for sufferers, but the majority of alternative do little to lessen up the pain muscle stiffness that often comes with the disease, states new guidelines released from the American Academy of Neurology.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

HealthDay News

NBC News

The Salt Lake Tribune

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.