New Research Study Says It is Possible for Women to Sexually Intimidate Men

New Research Study Says It is Possible for Women to Sexually Intimidate Men

A new research study has been released that says it is possible for women to indeed sexually intimidate men and nearly 20 percent of males surveyed stated that they had been forced against their will by females to have sex. The study ends up challenging commonly held beliefs about intimidation, gender and actual sexual assault. According to a research report that was printed up in the psychological journal, Psychology of Men and Masculinity, nearly 45 percent of high school and college age men stated they had experienced “unwanted sexual contact”, and just under 100 percent of all the males interviewed stated that the aggressor was a female colleague.

Researchers interviewed just under 300 young men and found that nearly 20 percent reported sexual pressure by force, just over 30 percent declared they were verbally pressured into having sex, and just over 25 percent explained they had experienced “unwanted seduction by sexual actions and behaviors”. Half of those in the survey exclaimed that they ended up having sex even though they did not want to and they felt it was completely against their will, 10 percent stated that sex was attempted on them but they stopped it, and 40 percent declared that the intimidation resulted in touching and/or kissing but they refused to let it go any further.

Dr. Bryana French, who is a professor of psychology and black studies at the University of Missouri and was one of the co-authors of the study, stated that male victims are much less willing to define sexual bullying in any sort of detail but if they are asked if it occurred, they will admit to it. However, all this leads to the question of the erectile part of sex. French explained that the research study defined sex as including vaginal, oral and anal, so it was possible that the sex act quite possibly did not involve any type of erection. But she added that it is possible for men to have erections even if they do not really want to engage in sexual intercourse. It also happens with females. Sometimes when women are going through sexual violence, their bodies end up responding in unexpected ways that do not at all resemble to how they are feeling emotionally. French added that they are in no way wanting the horrible experience to be happening even if their bodies are responding in another way.

She explained that being pressed into having sexual intercourse was connected to other types of perilous behaviors such as heavy drinking among the victims, and students who had been sexually forced while they were drinking or high on drugs showed substantial signs of distress, stated the survey’s findings. However, having unwanted sex did not seem to distress the victims’ self-worth. It may be the case that sexual intimidation by women does not bother men’s self-perceptions the same way it does to women when they have been forced into unwanted sexual encounters.

Any type of sexual victimization is a continual problem found in the United States, but the abuse of men is very rarely looked at, explained Dr. French. These findings might be able to help lead to better types of prevention by detecting the different kinds of coercion that men have to deal with and also by recognizing women as actually being real perpetrators against males.
French’s research sample was small but she is hoping the study will begin to help change people’s expectations about sexual violence and gender. She added that it was an ill-fated myth to believe that men could not be raped by women. This is not something to lessen the gender influence of sexual violence, but it is important to make sure not to ignore that men are being victimized as well.

To distinguish sexual intimidation from possible sexual child abuse, the survey educated students to not include any experiences they might have had with any members of their families. Some bullying examples included a partner threatened to stop seeing the test subject; a partner encouraged test subject to drink alcohol and then took advantage of test subject; a partner threatened to use or did use any kind of deadly weapon; and a partner has tried to interest test subject by sexually touching but test subject explained of no interest. For any further information, researchers also asked applicants to define in writing a time they felt they had been sexually pressured. The contributors also were asked to respond to several frequently used mental assessments in order to be able to measure just what their psychosomatic functioning, distress and risky comportment levels were at mentally.

The research study finding showed a much needed deeper examination for more scientific education about the thin track between sexual seduction and sexual intimidation, Dr. French explained, Even though not usually focused on in most sexual violence studies, unwanted seduction was a predominantly prevalent form of sexual intimidation in this research report, along with peer pressure and a victim’s own belief of having a personal sense of male responsibility. Seduction was a particularly prominent and possibly distinctive form of coercion used against teenage boys and younger men in comparison to their female colleagues, added Dr. French.

A new research study has been released that says it is possible for women to indeed sexually cocerce men and nearly 20 percent of males surveyed stated that they had been forced against their will by females to have sex.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

UPI News

Time News

Science Codex

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