Ohio Has Growing Number Of Mumps Cases

Ohio Has Growing Number Of Mumps Cases

In Ohio, there has been a growing number of mumps cases, so the Columbus Public Health officials have decided to offer special health clinics in order for individuals to receive the measles-mumps-rubella or MMR vaccine.

The vaccines are going to be available on a walk-in basis on Monday through Friday, at the Columbus Public Health Office at 240 Parsons Ave right downtown. Clinic hours range from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays; and 9 a.m. to noon on Wednesdays. The price of the shots is based on a sliding scale fee.

The health department in Columbus is looking into a growing number of cases of the mumps that have happened in the area. As of March 31, 2014, there had been nearly 112 cases of the illness reported in the Franklin County region.

To date, almost 90 of those cases were connected to outbreaks that were connected to Ohio State University. Persons who were born before the year 1987 are most likely to have only gotten one or even no MMR vaccines and need to be immunized.

Furthermore, any individual who had parents or caretakers who were against vaccinations also are at extreme risk if he or she never received the MMR vaccine.

Residents need to be checking with their primary care physicians to see if they are able to get a copy of their vaccination records.

Mumps is spread from person to person by saliva or mucus drops from the throat, nose, or mouth of an infected person, typically when the individual talks, sneezes or coughs. Mumps is very contagious and its symptoms are most usually fatigue, muscle aches, fever and swollen, extremely sore glands under the jaws or ears.

The complications of mumps include hearing loss, meningitis and can even affect the reproductive systems in both women and men.

Ohio health spokespersons stated that anyone who has come down with mumps needs to stay at home for at least five days after the symptoms start. They need to cover their noses and mouths when they sneeze or cough, and they also must wash their hands often with warm water and soap.

Also the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or CDC states that among males, mumps could lead to orchitis, which is a testicular swelling. It causes nausea, pain, fever and vomiting. With females who come down with mumps, they can get inflammation of the breasts or the ovaries. Nearly 15 percent of people that end up with mumps also suffer stiff necks and headaches. Anyone who starts to experience such symptoms needs to get in contact with his or her primary care physician immediately.

To possibly avoid this problem and if the reader lives near Columbus, Ohio, the above information is repeated here:

Columbus Public Health officials are offering special health clinics in order for individuals to receive the measles-mumps-rubella or MMR vaccine. The vaccines are going to be available on a walk-in basis on Monday through Friday, at the Columbus Public Health Office at 240 Parsons Ave right downtown. Clinic hours range from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays; and 9 a.m. to noon on Wednesdays. The price of the shots is based on a sliding scale fee.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

FOX News

NPR News

Ohio Weekly News

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