Pink Slime Lawsuit Against ABC News Will Be Upheld

Pink Slime Lawsuit Against ABC News Will Be Upheld

A controversial assertion that was made by a U.S. television network in which a common meat product was only “pink slime” will be tested in a court of law after a judge decided to approve a legal action against the claim and the lawsuit will be upheld. Beef Products, Inc. stated that the depiction of what the food business called “finely textured, lean beef”, an ingredient that is in some hamburgers, was falsely alarming and offensive. It also caused sales to decline all over the nation.

On Thursday, a South Dakota judge permitted the majority of complaints from the defamation lawsuit that was brought on by Beef Products against ABC News and anchor Diane Sawyer to continue onward. The major media company had wanted the lawsuit to be tossed out

The company argues that after a sequence of dramatic reporting that aired on the ABC evening news, the company had to close three of its processing plants and lay off at least 700 employees. The lawsuit contends that ABC distorted its coverage of “pink slime”, which also cost the business over $1 billion.

ABC has contradicted with the statement that the meat industry does not get to command how individuals define its products, and it continues to say that its reporting was both fair and accurate. Nevertheless, for numerous Americans, the reports were the kind of news items that makes one take notice. However to censors, ABC’s reports turned out to be identical with broadcasting wrongdoing.

However, in her ruling, Judge Cheryle Gering stated that ABC News is not sheltered from accountability only by phrasing their reports to include one lone sentence that states authorities have said the product is both nutritious and safe. From this, First Amendment specialists state that the “pink slime situation” could even become an assessment for showing an attempt to get around an epic news story with an offhand disclaimer could be considered enough to guard reporters from any responsibility even if that story ends up hurting a company’s bottom line.

It is definite that the “pink slime” story has raised numerous genuine concerns about food. One is that U.S. food labeling does not necessitate producers to put ingredient on the product independently. However the U.S. Department of Agriculture has started calling for more particulars to be put on the labels of meat.

Judge Gering’s ruling was technical and not on the evidence of the case. ABC News has stated that it will forcefully defend itself. However the ruling does mean that the beef company’s lawyers are able to start the detection process of how ABC News was able to create the story in the first place.

Beef Products and attorneys stated back in December of 2013 that even though ABC News had included a disclaimer, the news report had also said that the product was “not meat” and quizzed the Food and Drug Administration’s statement of that it was harmless; due to the fact several scientists had probed about its use. In this way, Beef Products argued that the network’s resolve was to harm the business, since it was the only one named in the news report.

A report from back in 2006 from the Pennsylvania Center for the First Amendment stated that United States judges at a particular point will start to roll back at least part of journalism’s smear defenses in order to create more of a level playing field for accusers. A controversial assertion that was made by a U.S. television network in which a common meat product was only “pink slime” will be tested in a court of law after a judge decided to approve a legal action against the claim.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

The Telegraph

Courthouse News Online

Christian Science Monitor

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