Slightly Elevated Blood Pressure Cause People to Be at Greater Stroke Risk

Slightly Elevated Blood Pressure Cause People to be at Greater Stroke Risk

Researchers who have been looking into new investigations to prior blood pressure studies have discovered that slightly elevated blood pressure which is considered to be raised but not enough to be medically considered as high blood pressure is still causing people to be at greater risks for strokes. The scientists discovered that people who had the condition known as prehypertension was associated with just over a 65 percent increased stroke risk.

Dr. Joshua Willey explained that there has been much discrepancy in the medical community about people who have prehypertension and whether they really had a higher chance of suffering from strokes than the general public. A person’s blood pressure is measured by looking at two different numbers. The first is called systolic or top number and it takes a measurement of the pressure inside the arteries of the heart when it beats. The second number is known as diastolic or the bottom number and it is the pressure which is found inside the heart’s arteries between any heartbeats.

A standard blood pressure is considered to be a top number that is 120 mm Hg or less and a bottom number that reads 80 mm Hg or below, states the American Heart Association. Hypertension or high blood pressure as it is also known is defined when there is a read-out of 140/90 mm Hg or higher. When an individual has hypertension, along with other risk factors such as heart disease, diabetes and high cholesterol, these are all certain risk factors that can cause people to suffer strokes, explains the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Any blood pressure read-outs that are located between what is considered normal and high are called prehypertension. Prior studies had failed to find any increased chance of strokes happening in individuals who had blood pressure evaluations which were just under what was considered the limit for hypertension by a few points. However, since that time, more information has come in and scientists decided they needed to look into the data more deeply.

The studies ended up combining results of nearly 20 different research reports which included nearly 762,400 participants from all over the world. When people who were considered to have prehypertension were then compared to individuals who had regular blood pressure, those who had the elevated blood pressure, but not hypertension were almost 65 percent more likely to possibly suffer from a stroke. Prehypertension is considered to be in the range of having a blood pressure reading that is just over 120/80 mm Hg and 129/84 mm Hg. Higher prehypertension is having a read-out of 130/85 mm Hg to 139/89 mm Hg.

The researchers discovered that people who had what was considered a lower range of prehypertension was linked to around a 45 percent increase chance of having a stroke and having higher range prehypertension was lined to having a 95 percent increased chance. The CDC has released reports that around 800,000 American citizens suffer from strokes each year.

It is becoming clearer that in the world of strokes and cerebrovascular ailments, there definitely needs to be more concern about even prehypertension. If a person’s blood pressure is close to 140/90 mm Hg, a person needs to realize he or she just may be at a higher chance for having a stroke than they even realize. However what is troubling with this newfound information is that scientists studying this information have not yet been able to define as of this time whether blood pressure treatment of patients who have the condition of prehypertension will lessen their chance of having strokes or any other vascular episodes over the passage of time.

Instead, this study has shown that primary care physicians probably should start endorsing changes in lifestyles to their patients who are suffering from prehypertension. Such way of life alterations would include changes in diet and more exercise. The researchers who have been giving new examinations to prior blood pressure studies have discovered that blood pressure which is considered to be elevated but not enough to be medically considered as high blood pressure is still causing people to be at greater risks for strokes. The scientists discovered that people who had the condition known as prehypertension was associated with just over a 65 percent increased stroke risk.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

NBC News

U.S. News and World Report

Prevention News

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