Why Do We Have Spring?

Why Do We Have Spring?

Many people wonder why we have spring? Even though it still may not feel like it due to the temperatures, winter is just about officially over because the first day of spring arrives on March 20. For anyone who lives in the Northern Hemisphere, the spring or vernal equinox occurs during the month of March while the sun moves over the cosmic equator. In 2014, the sun will cross over the unseen line that separates the two hemispheres on Thursday at about 12:56 p.m. EDT.

The Earth goes through such astronomical occasions that are known as equinoxes and solstices four times each year. They indicate the ending of one season and the starting of another one. The two equinoxes happen in March and September and bring in both the spring and fall. The solstices happen in June and December and designate when beginnings of summer and winter are. Individuals who live in the Northern Hemisphere will be saying hello to spring while people that live in the Southern Hemisphere will see the beginning of autumn.

There are a few mythologies that are linked with the yearly spring equinox such as daytime is the same length as night on this day. This is not really true. Numerous people think so but the days of day and night equality actually occur right before the spring equinox happens. Geoff Chester, who is a public affairs expert with the U.S. Naval Observatory, stated that the day/night length is centered on location. He stated that when it happens hinges on where a person is located on the Earth’s surface.

Many think that the spring equinox falls on the exact same day every year, but this is also not true. The spring equinox does always fall in the latter part of March; the precise date can change from one year to the next. This really has more to do with how many number of calendar days there are than the actual equinox itself. The Earth has to take a little more than the usual 365 days to do one total revolution around the sun. Yet the Gregorian calendar still only shows 365 days most years, not counting a leap year. So the vernal equinox just might happen to fall on March 20 for numerous years in a row and then suddenly happen on March 21 the next year.

An egg being able to be balanced on its end is a myth that just never seems to go away. Anyone that tries to balance the oval objects will find that it is not any easier during the spring equinox than it happens to be on any other day during the year. The Earth’s axis does nothing to aid in stabilizing the egg on one end.

The broomstick legend has been around longer than the egg and it still lasts as well. Many believe that a broom is able to stand on its own about the time the spring equinox happens. Having the ability to keep a broom balanced on its bristles has absolutely nothing to do with the vernal equinox and more to do with a person’s own talent.

So even though it may not feel like it, winter is just about officially over because the first day of spring arrives on March 20. For anyone who lives in the Northern Hemisphere, the spring or vernal equinox occurs during the month of March while the sun moves over the cosmic equator. In 2014, the sun will cross over the unseen line that separates the two hemispheres on Thursday at about 12:56 p.m. EDT. This is why we have spring.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

USA Today

The Epoch Times

The Huffington Post

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