Women Learn the Warning Signs of a Stroke

Women Learn The Warning Signs of a Stroke

A new research study shows that the majority of women state they would dial up emergency services if they were having a stroke, but the problem is that most do not know what the main warning signs are of a stroke. The report authors talked to over 1,200 women who resided in the United States in order to see what their understanding was of the warning signs of a stroke.

The research study chief author, Dr. Heidi Mochari-Greenberger, who works as a research scientist at Columbia University in New York City, stated that they actually saw quite a high bit of knowledge about calling nine-one-one if a stroke was to hit. Nearly 85 percent of females knew to call and request an ambulance if a stroke occurred. However, that is where the good news ended.

Just over 50 percent of the women in the survey realized that numbness or sudden weakness on one side of the body or the face is a warning sign that a stroke is happening. Even less that, at just under 45 percent, knew that having trouble with speech is also a sign of a stroke. Less than one-quarter of the women were able to recognize the following as other specific stroke signs such as severe sudden headache which was just under 25 percent, inexplicable dizziness at 20 percent, and the sudden loss of vision in one eye which was just under 19 percent.

Dr. Mochari-Greenberger explained that such results propose that any efforts that can improve stroke warning signs among women has the possibility to diminish any delays of receiving treatment for strokes and could definitely improve the health outcomes in women.

Dr. Keith Siller, who works as a medical director of a stroke treatment center in New York City, said that what really seemed to make the story even worse is that Hispanic and black females who have different types of risk factors, such as more chances of having cholesterol and hypertension and also have more trouble with health management issues, are among those who do not identify the basic signs of stroke. He stated that these occurrences with minority women ended up being a double whammy that had to be addressed.

25 percent of Hispanic women had no knowledge whatsoever of stroke warning signs, in comparison to just under 20 percent for both white and black women, explained the research report. Such a failure to recognize the classic symptoms of a stroke is not just limited to females, stated Siller. This problem is not something that is gender-specific. Regrettably, it is a big concern for both sexes. However, due to the fact that women usually live longer than men, they are more affected by strokes. Siller added that there was no question that women have more strokes than men. The older they get, the more likely they are to suffer from a stroke.

Females also seem to take less care about themselves because they usually are taking care of others in their families first. They are most often the backbone and support of those around them . They care for their husbands and children and often many times ignore themselves as individuals who also need to be taken care of.

Strokes are the third leading cause of death for women in the United States, stated the American Heart Association. They follow heart disease and cancer.

Dr. Mochari-Greenberger stated that younger women really need to learn what the warning signs are as well. Strokes might be rising in occurrence with young females and they have the chance to avoid strokes among themselves and to be able to know when other individuals are having one and to call emergency services when it happens.

Mochari-Greenberger and her associates presented their findings on Wednesday at an American Heart Association meeting that was located in San Francisco. The study was also printed up in the journal Stroke.

The new research study has shown the majority of women state they would dial up emergency services if they were having a stroke, but the problem is that most do not know what the main warning signs are of a stroke. Research report authors talked to over 1,200 women who resided in the United States in order to see what their understanding was of the warning signs of a stroke.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

The Huffington Post

Medical Express News

NPR News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.