Blue Farm by Charles C. Anderson (Review)

Blue Farm by Charles C. Anderson (Review)


Blue Farm by the supremely talented author, Charles C. Anderson, is the third book he’s written in his “Farm” series, and it just might be the best one yet. The Farm was the first book in the series about the illustrious Carlson family and the 4,000-acre piece of land they own in Virginia, and it was followed by Nuclear Farm and Blue Farm, both books released by the author simultaneously.

What really will draw readers into Blue Farm and the other books in this series is realizing that the “Farm” of the novels is actually a real place, a plantation that has been in the author’s family, and the fictional Carlson family, since the 1760s. Three Presidents have visited there, James Monroe, James Madison, and Thomas Jefferson. There are tunnels underneath the main plantation building and the land, and a cave system, which has been used for many purposes over the centuries.  Blue Farm by Charles C. Anderson (Review)

The “Farm” is much more than most farms, which are parcels of land with crops and sometimes livestock. The “Farm” of the series becomes a character in its own right, offering Andy Carlson and his family a strong fortified place, a location that is easily defended if you know the many secrets about the land there.

While The Farm focused more on the head of the Carlson household, Andrew (Andy), an ex-SEAL and emergency physician (a character who is similar in many ways to the author), Nuclear Farm saw his wife, the former CIA operative Lindsey Carlson, and their twins, Ava and Jack, become more important characters and more involved in the plot.

In Nuclear Farm, while pregnant with their third child, Peewee, Lindsey helped disarm nuclear warheads that the family discovered planted around the country by terrorists. She blames that, at least in part, for Peewee being smaller and more fragile that Ava and Jack were as children.

However, Peewee’s still got the Carlson intellect, and he’s much beloved by his older siblings, who plan to attend college at the University of Virginia so that they can still be near enough to Peewee to still see him frequently and help him become the best person that he can be. Peewee goes with them when they visit the University of Virginia to check it out. Unfortunately, Peewee gets kidnapped there, and only his broken glasses, with a few drops of blood, are left behind.

This terrible kidnapping mobilizes the entire Carlson clan into trying to figure out who took Peewee, and why. Also, of course, they want to get Peewee back, alive, and get revenge on whoever was responsible for the savage act.

Andy and Lindsey get the FBI and CIA into the act, to see if their resources will help them locate Peewee faster. Agent Hamilton from the CIA meets with the Carlsons, but he at first says that it’s not really their responsibility to search for missing children.

Andy reminds Hamilton that he, Lindsey, Ava, and Jack had all participated in a major CIA action, and that the President had personally asked for their help in the matter. Also, Andy tells Hamilton that there’s a possibility that one family that was involved in the CIA action a family which experienced many deaths because of it, might be attempting to get revenge.

Agent Hamilton acknowledges that this could very well be the case. He tells Andy that he will assemble a major task force, but — in return — he asks for Andy to become an active CIA agent and accept certain specialized jobs befitting his particular unique skill set. Hamilton says that he even has a job lined up for Andy right then, but it could wait until Peewee was found. Not only Andy, but also Lindsey, agree to the terms Hamilton lays out for them.

Not long after they accept, they get a demand for money from whoever kidnapped Peewee. The kidnapper, or kidnappers, demand $5 million for his return. However, Peewee’s dead body is discovered buried on the Carlson land just days later. The people who murdered Peewee indicate that Peewee is just the first of the Carlsons that they will target.

Ava and Jack decide to attend college at the University of Virginia, but also join forces with their parents to bring the murderers to justice. The twins learn that the two remaining members of the Ivanov family, who are suspected of being the kidnappers/murderers, are also going to be attending the college.

Blue Farm is a suspenseful, emotional book about what the Carlson family does when they lose a person they love, a family member, and they’re attacked. The surprise ending will leave readers on the edge of their seats, wanting to read more from the marvelous pen of Charles C. Anderson. Blue Farm is a Must-Read book, if you love to read action-packed thrillers, and especially if you’ve read the first two novels in the series.

Written by: Douglas Cobb

Blue Farm at Amazon

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