Indiana First State to Opt Out of Common Core

Indiana First State to Opt Out of Common Core

Indiana Republican Governor Mike Pence has signed new legislation which makes the Hoosier state the first to opt out of Common Core criteria, amidst conservative outrage about the education standards. It is the very first key victory for antagonists of Common Core, who believe the national curriculum principles steal from states the right to establish their own ideals.

Conservative protesters have been insistent about working on rolling back Common Core requirements in numerous states, several of which had slowed down or even stopped application.

However the Common Core package was never a federal directive. It was created by the National Governors Association, by a panel led by Delaware Democratic Governor Jack Markell and former Georgia Republican Governor Sonny Perdue. Indiana happened to be one of the first 45 states that adopted the standards, under Pence’s predecessor, former Indiana Republican Governor Mitch Daniels.

Yet it created a backlash from conservative campaigners that has erected a powerful political force. There were around 100 bills written up in hopes of slowing down, reversing or even attempting to stop the requirements of Common Core that have been were introduced in various state legislatures all across the United States in 2014 alone. This is already an increase of 85 percent over the entire year of 2013 in total.

There actually had been little resistance to Common Core but Indiana decided to officially reject Common Core criterions after the Hoosier Board of Education voted 10-1 in favor of a different standard. They wanted to bring in an altered law as soon as possible.

Yet the new law does not mean Indiana students will be studying anything radically different from children in adjoining states. The legislation attacks any mention to Common Core and entails the state board of education to embrace what it calls “career and college readiness” criteria which meet the national and international standards and fulfills the federal standards while upholding Indiana’s control.

It does not precisely prohibit Common Core objectives from being contained within the new Hoosier state principles. Therefore this causes some opponents of the board of education to declare the new standards which are being created are just too close to Common Core. The bill still calls for Indiana to meet the federal education criteria in order to make sure the state continues to receive education funding.

However the new criteria are already under scrutiny as the activist group known as Hoosiers Against Common Core cautioned that the replacement was only just a “standby” version of Common Core.

Ironically Indiana had been one of the very first states to implement Common Core education standards yet it turns around to be the very first state to officially abandon it as well. New legislation has made the Hoosier state the first to opt out of Common Core criteria, in the midst of conservative anger about the education standards. This has become the very first key victory for antagonists of Common Core, who think the national curriculum principles rip-off from states the right to establish their own ideals.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

The Huffington Post

The Washington Post

The N.Y. Times

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