Infertile Men May Be More Likely to Die Before Men of Same Age Who Have Normal Semen

Infertile Men May Be More Likely to Die Before Men of Same Age Who Have Normal Semen

Scientists are reporting that a new research study suggests that men who have been rendered infertile because of deficiencies in their sperm and semen are more likely to die before men who have normal semen. Over a time period of around eight years, males with two or more deformities in their semen had a risk of death which was at least double that of men who had healthy semen.

Examiners printed up a research report in the most recent issue of the medical journal Human Reproduction. So by knowing this, primary care physicians who are treating infertile men for problems should instruct them about various healthy habits which could help extend their survival rates, explained Dr. Michael Eisenberg, who was the chief lead in the research study, and is also a professor of urology at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

He stated that there might be a window of opportunity for the men. When they visit their doctor they might do other things which could benefit their health. Eisenberg declared that he saw the findings as a chance for the males to start paying more attention to their health and be proactive instead of reactive.

For the study, Eisenberg and his team examined the medical records of nearly 12,500 men ranging in age from 20 to 50 who had went to the Stanford School of Medicine or Baylor College of Medicine, which is located in Houston, to be checked out for infertility

At each of the clinics, doctors chronicled information on the quality of the men’s semen, such as volume, sperm count, sperm shape and also movement. The researchers also looked at patient data and compared death records to trace the men’s death rates, while taking into account any core health issues which might have hurt the quality of semen.

Although there was no single semen anomaly which forecast early death, males who had two or more abnormalities had nearly two times the risk of death during the study than those who did not have semen irregularities. The higher the number of defects, the greater the risk of death, the study discovered.

Sperm concentration, low semen volume, overall sperm count, sperm activity and complete count of active sperm precisely were linked with a higher risk. Irregularly shaped sperm did not seem to be connected to higher death risk.

It is extremely important to identify potential causes of male infertility which could be acted upon and consequently decrease the higher mortality rate. However it is important to remember that this study was not planned to prove that semen deformities led to a greater death rate, only to show there was an association between the factors. After the study the researchers do have a number of ideas as to why poor semen could be related to premature death.

For one thing, reproduction is a critical human activity, so it is easy to figure out if the male body cannot produce sperm, there are most likely other things that body cannot do well either.

Sperm defects could also be related to levels of testosterone, which is a very important male hormone. It has been linked to longevity in men. Social influences also factor in with fertility and should not be ruled out. If a person looks at research studies, men who have children enjoy lengthier lives and have lower mortality.

Even though this study only examined men, it is believed that women who are infertile probably face a similar increased risk of death. It is believed that infertility can give a window into a man’s later health, and that this study most likely applies to both sexes. If studied, it is expected that scientists would see the same results in women.

Repeating: scientists are reporting that a new research study suggests that men who have been rendered infertile because of deficiencies in their sperm and semen are more likely to die before men who have normal semen.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

Science World Report

Medical Daily News

WebMD

2 Responses to "Infertile Men May Be More Likely to Die Before Men of Same Age Who Have Normal Semen"

  1. D. Wood   May 17, 2014 at 2:55 pm

    What about Vicectomys? Would having one make you more “at risk” later in life?

    Reply
    • Kimberly Ruble   May 17, 2014 at 3:39 pm

      No I don’t believe it includes those.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.