Regular Low Doses of Aspirin Might Lower Chance of Contracting Pancreatic Cancer

Regular Low Doses of Aspirin Might Lower Change of Contracting Pancreatic Cancer

A new research report is saying that taking regular low doses of aspirin might lower the chance of contracting pancreatic cancer. The research study was recently printed up in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention and it looked at the various health information from over 360 people who had pancreatic cancer and nearly 700 individuals who did not have the disease.

The research group discovered that those who took low doses on a regular basis reduced the chance of pancreatic cancer by nearly 50 percent for the people who had started an aspirin treatment plan three years before the research study. Those who began an aspirin treatment plan 20 years before the study saw a reduced chance of at least 60 percent.

Dr. Harvey A. Risch, who is a professor of epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health in New Haven, Connecticut, explained that the team discovered that the taking of low dose aspirin was linked to cutting the chance of pancreatic cancer to around half. Some evidence showed that longer the low dose aspirin was used, even lower the risk. There will be around one in 60 adults who will come down with pancreatic cancer in the upcoming year and the five year survival rate is less than five percent, so it is vital to find ways to avert this disease.

The doctor added that there appeared to be more than enough evidence to show people who may be thinking about using aspirin to reduce their chance for cardiovascular disease that they can feel confident that their use may also lessen their chance of getting pancreatic cancer. In the research study, the group defined low dose as being between 75 to 325 milligrams.

The use of low dose aspirin was shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer in both men and women. The group did their research from statistics that were based on various medical assessments and personal interviews that were performed. The patients were selected from 30 different hospitals located all across the state of Connecticut between the years of 2005 and 2009.

The team also looked at other factors like body mass index, having a history of diabetes and also a smoking history. The study subjects were also asked when they began using aspirin, the amount of years they used aspirin, the dose amount of aspirin they used if it was low or regular and when or if they had quit using aspirin.

Out of all the study participants, just over 55 percent were males, around 90 percent were non-Hispanics, about 50 percent were either current or former smokers, and almost 20 percent had been diagnosed with having diabetes within three years preceding to the study. The research report stated that taking regular low doses of aspirin might lower the chance of contracting pancreatic cancer. It was printed up in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention and it looked at information on over 360 people who had pancreatic cancer and nearly 700 individuals who did not have the disease.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

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