The Most Overused Phrases in a Job Interview

job interview

With job the job market currently limited and highly competitive, knowing what can help, or more importantly hurt, an applicant during the job search process is crucial. Here are some of the most overused phrases in job interviews as cited by anonymous recruitment staffs from major companies. The reasons for why these phrases are overused are provided by said recruitment staffs.

“I’m really hard working.” In a job interview, everyone is considered to be hard working by the interviewer. Rarely does anyone admit the alternative. Because everyone uses the phrase, it has become “white noise.” It cannot differentiate one canfidate from anyone else vying for the job. Interviewers said they would rather have their candidates be more specific. In what ways are they hard working? What do they do that they consider to be hard work?

“I am a team player.” Again, the vagueness of this phrase lends to its irritation amongst recruitment professionals during a job interview. It gives no indication of the candidate’s skills in working with others. Employers admitted that they would much rather hear examples of how a potential employee worked in collaboration and how it contributed to their success.

“I am loyal to a fault.” While loyalty is an important trait to emphasize in a job interview, employers rarely believe the hyperboles given to them that describe the sacrifices an interviewee is willing to make if hired. Recruitment staff would much rather they be honest with them about their goals and what they plan to achieve with their company, even if it means they want to use their position as a “stepping stone.” An honest explanation of goals is much more descriptive and believable.

“I can do anything you need.” In a job interview, this phrase is usually immediately met with the thought from the interviewer, “I doubt it.” This is one of the most annoying of the overused phrases to employers in a job interview because it is a vague overstatement of someone’s capabilities and it is an inappropriate assumption of what the applicant’s duties will entail. Employers would much rather hear that the prospective employee will do whatever they can, and then and make an effort to learn more from them by asking questions and putting in effort.

“How much does it pay?” This phrase is rarely met with a positive reaction from interviewers. Recruiters point out that their candidates will know their compensation if they get an offer. They realize a lot of the people they are interviewing are in it for the money, but this phrase makes it clearly evident.

“I think I’m a perfect fit for this job.” Enthusiasm is appreciated by interviewers, but this member of the most overused phrases in an job interview conveys a lack of understanding of the position. It is better for an interviewee to cite an understanding of the position and how they can, specifically, succeed in that position.

The common trend among the most overused phrases in an job interview is vagueness. Employers would much rather have their candidates describe their skills specifically while citing examples, and to be honest about their goals instead of using generic exaggeration.

By Andres Loubriel

Sources:
Excelle
Forbes
Hcareers

Your Thoughts?