Earth’s Largest Aquatic Insect Discovered and Is Something of Nightmares

Earth's Largest Aquatic Insect Discovered and is Something of Nightmares

The largest aquatic insect on Earth has possibly been discovered and it is something that could cause nightmares. The creature, known as a dobsonfly, has enormous horn-like jaws and a wingspan similar to the size of a sparrow or robbin. It is being reported in the Chinese media as being a record breaking find.

Scientists are stating the bug belongs to the insect group Megaloptera. The name means “large, folded wings.” However it has not been officially named yet. The collection also includes large creatures known as fishflies along with bugs called alderflies.

The dobsonfly is considered to be the largest “aquatic” insect because it lives in the water as a larvae most of its life. It only moves to land when it becomes an adult and then will live a few days at the longest. Even though the dobsonfly larvae is a vicious underwater predator, when it becomes an adult, it stops eating completely and only sips fruit juices or nectar.

Although it may be the largest aquatic bug, it is nowhere near the biggest insect in the world in any aspect. The University of Florida Book of Insect Records states that the record for the largest wingspan for an insect is held by both the white moth and also by numerous huge beetles and grasshopper like creatures called giant wetas. These all are bigger and have much stockier builds than the newly discovered dobsonfly.

However there is an insect that is very similar and not that much smaller than the new Chinese insect, which resides in Canada. It is known as the Eastern dobsonfly and the males have a kind of sickle shaped, tusk like mandible. This was explained by entomologists Geoff Scudder and Rob Cannings, both of whom work at the Canadian Royal B.C. Museum.

The two gentlemen wrote a scientific research paper over the newly found Megaloptera species, which told about how the males had been witnessed fighting with one another and also prodding females during various courtship rituals in order to try and mate.

In China, the world’s most enormous aquatic insect might possibly have been discovered and it is something that could cause night terrors. The creature, known as a dobsonfly, has giant horn-like jaws and a wingspan similar to the size of a robbin’s. It is being reported in the Chinese media as a record breaking find.

Scientists are stating the bug belongs to the insect group Megaloptera. The name means “large, folded wings.” The collection also includes large creatures known as fishflies along with bugs called alderflies.

While the dobsonfly is claimed as the largest “aquatic” insect, it lives in the water as a larvae most of its life. When it becomes an adult, it moves to land, and will only live a few days at the longest. While the larvae is a vicious underwater predator, when it grows to adulthood, it stops eating completely and only sip fruit juice or nectar.

Even though it may be the largest aquatic bug, it is nowhere near the biggest insect in the world in any aspect. The University of Florida Book of Insect Records states that the record for the largest wingspan for an insect is held by both the white moth and also by numerous huge beetles and also several grasshopper like creatures called giant wetas. These all are bigger and have much stockier builds than the newly discovered dobsonfly.

However there is an insect that is very similar and not that much smaller than the new Chinese dobsonfly insect, which resides in Canada. It is known as the Eastern dobsonfly and the males have a kind of sickle shaped, tusk like mandible, stated entomologists Geoff Scudder and Rob Cannings. Both gentlemen work at the Canadian Royal B.C. Museum.

The two entomologists penned a scientific paper about the newly found Megaloptera species, which talked about how the males of the group have been seen fighting with one another and also poking the females during various courtship rituals in order to get female insect attention.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

The Huffington Post

CBC News

The Daily Browse

 

2 Responses to "Earth’s Largest Aquatic Insect Discovered and Is Something of Nightmares"

  1. Kimberly Ruble   July 28, 2014 at 9:04 pm

    I totally agree with you!

    Reply
  2. Tabitha Farrar   July 28, 2014 at 8:11 pm

    Creepy as that is, I am SO glad its not a spider!

    Reply

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