First Supermoon of 2014 Going to Appear This Weekend

First Supermoon of 2014 Going to Appear This Weekend

This summer is going to be the season of “Supermoons,” because not just one or even two, but three of these bright, full Moons of 2014, are going to appear in the sky, the first of them will be visible on Saturday. It was the Supermoon of June, 2013 that grabbed the world’s attention. It was nearly 15 percent larger and 30 percent brighter than any other full Moon last year. This weekend means that people across the globe can enjoy yet another extra large Moon.

A Supermoon, which is also called a “Perigee Moon,” happens when the Moon goes full about the same time it hits “perigee.” That is the nearest point to the Earth along its elongated orbit. The Moon might appear to be larger, although the difference in its distance from Earth is only a couple percent at these times, stated NASA.

Even though the event may seem rare, it is actually fairly common. Full Moons take place near perigee about every 13 months and 18 days, so the event is not really unusual. In fact, 2013 had three Perigee Moons in a row, but for some reason, the one in June was the only one that was extensively reported on.

The Supermoon trio of 2014 is scheduled to happen on July 12, Aug. 10 and Sept. 9. On Saturday, the Moon will be about 222,610 miles away from the Earth. That is 30,000 miles closer than when it was the farthest away this year. The Moon will be closest this year on Aug. 10, when it will be 221,750 miles from Earth. There will be many people who think that the Moon on Saturday night will look like the biggest Moon they have ever seen if they happen to notice it coming up over a distant horizon.

Last month’s Moon was also known as a “Strawberry Moon” and ended up making headlines as well due to the fact that it appeared in the sky on Friday the 13th. That is an occurrence that had not happened in over ten years and caused many superstitious individuals to become somewhat cagey.

Even though Moon buffs want to see Earth’s satellite in all its glory on Saturday night, they are especially looking forward to the Supermoon coming in August. That is because the Moon itself will grow full in the very same hour of being at the perigree point in its orbit. This means it will be just over 860 miles closer to the Earth than the full Moon this Saturday night.

For anyone that might miss out on either the first Supermoon or the second mega Supermoon, do not lose hope for the summer. The third one will still show up in September as was stated above. The summer is going to be the season of “Supermoons,” because not just one or even two, but three of these bright, full Moons are going to appear in the sky, the first of them will be visible on Saturday. That means this weekend people across the globe can enjoy yet another extra large Moon.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

ABC News

Nature World News

CBS News

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