Scientists Acknowledge Blood Test Might Predict Alzheimer’s Disease

Scientists Acknowledge Blood Test Might Predict Alzheimer's Disease

A team of British scientists have acknowledged 10 different blood proteins test that might possibly predict with nearly 90 percent accuracy whether an individual showing early signs of memory loss will develop Alzheimer’s disease within a year. Alzheimer’s is one of aging’s most perplexing diseases. Even after many years of intense research, there still is no cure and very little in any way of treatment.

The highly sought after Alzheimer’s research of identifying biomarkers in the blood, which could possibly predict the eventual development of dementia is being looked at excitedly. Regrettably other efforts to track such blood biomarkers have found precious few leads. The trouble is that what scientists happen to measure in the blood does not always happen to echo what is going on in the brain, explained Henrik Zetterberg, who was a clinical neurochemist at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

Researchers also initiated screening healthy patients to see how the various proteins in the blood were at predicting the onset of dementia in otherwise healthy individuals and the evolution from minor mental impairment to actual full blown Alzheimer’s disease.

Earlier this year, Howard Federoff and his colleagues, working at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C., printed up a research report in the journal Nature Medicine on the 10 proteins recognized through the screening processes.

However what does the paper really mean for Alzheimer’s research? It hinges on context. Such tests are not projected to be used on everyone who is over the age of 60. They also rely on the consistency of such monitors in future studies. If the results stand up to continued testing, they might very well aid the field in continuing to move more focus to early detection through the blood.

When scientists first began look for blood based biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease, they did not believe they would succeed, yet over the course of a decade of taking blood samples from Alzheimer’s patients, the researchers discovered various protein levels, which interconnected with the progress of dementia. In the research paper, the group wrote about the 10 proteins, recognized from a list of nearly 30 prior acknowledged and validated markers.

The majority of Alzheimer’s tests would probably never be given to the general population, but instead only the patients who went to their primary care physicians complaining of perceptive problems. The medical purpose of the blood test might have some usage in a memory clinic in the future.

The British team of scientists has recognized 10 different blood proteins that might possibly predict with nearly 90 percent accuracy whether an individual showing early signs of memory loss will develop Alzheimer’s disease within a year. Alzheimer’s is one of aging’s most confounding diseases. Even after many years of examination, there still is no cure and very little in any way of treatment.

The highly sought after Alzheimer’s research of identifying biomarkers in the blood, which could possibly predict the eventual development of dementia is being looked at eagerly. Regrettably other efforts to track such blood biomarkers have found precious few leads. The trouble is that what scientists happen to measure in the blood does not always happen to echo what is going on in the brain, explained Henrik Zetterberg, who was a clinical neurochemist at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden about studying Alzheimer’s disease.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

The Washington Post

BBC News

The Scientist

Your Thoughts?