Climate Change Takes New York City by Storm

Climate Change
Climate change is a geo-political hot topic that is garnering much attention as it is becoming increasingly apparent that the situation poses a global threat. Response to the issue has included several acts of civil disobedience, such as demonstrations, sit-ins, and protests across the globe. Case in point: more than 100 demonstrators were arrested in lower Manhattan on September 22, after blocking traffic along Broadway for hours as part of a climate change rally. The protest, which was called Flood Wall Street, included a brief march and a sit-in around the Charging Bull statue in the Financial District of New York City.

Climate change demonstrators lined up in Battery Park to march mid-morning on Monday. According to police, despite warnings given to divert to side streets, the protesters occupied the main thoroughfare of Broadway and obstructed vehicular traffic. Police scrambled to flank the protesters for public safety reasons. If arrested, the group was told in advance by organizers to tell police, “I am going to remain silent and I want to speak to a lawyer.”

According to authorities, most of the arrests took place on Monday around 6:45 p.m. EST, when NYPD officers ordered several hundred people blocking the roadway at Broadway and Wall Street to disperse and clear the blocked traffic routes. The protesters were informed if they dispersed and cleared the roadways, no charges would be filed. In defiance, approximately 100 protesters remained in the roadway with arms linked. Most of the protesters offered little resistance as they were arrested, put in plastic handcuffs, searched, and directed to waiting police vans. However, it was also revealed that officers used pepper spray on those deemed unruly.

Hours before the mass arrests occurred, two people were arrested for disorderly conduct, according to authorities. One of the first arrests came around 1:30 p.m. EST on Monday, when a St. Paul, Minn. protest organizer scaled a telephone booth in order to rally the crowd. Police were waiting for the protester when he descended the phone booth.

As climate change takes New York City by storm, police arrested more than 100 protesters on charges of disorderly conduct, nearly all of whom were detained during the organized sit-in. Organizers of the Flood Wall Street event, much like the People’s Climate March, which occurred on September 21 and drew hundreds of thousands of attendees in the name of climate change, was timed to coincide with the United Nations’ Climate Change Summit, which was set to begin on September 23.

The protesters occupied the streets of New York City chanting and proclaiming their desire for a better world. They carried signs and displayed banners with similar slogans, as well as additional signage that blamed capitalism for climate change. During the demonstration, inflatable balls, which the organizers dubbed “carbon bubbles,” were passed around the crowd. When one of the balls bounced near police officers patrolling the event, it was promptly deflated. This action elicited an echo section of boos from the crowd. Another demonstrator tried to toss a lasso around the Charging Bull statue in the NYC Financial District, as the crowd cheered. However, it fell short of the statue and was confiscated by police.

As climate change takes New York City by storm, the NYPD found themselves inundated with climate change protesters, who flooded the NYC streets in an effort to spread their message for a better world. Climate change is a geo-political hot topic that is garnering much attention as it is becoming increasingly apparent that the situation poses a global threat. Response to the issue has included several acts of civil disobedience, such as demonstrations, sit-ins, and protests across the globe. This was most certainly the case when more than 100 demonstrators were arrested in the Financial District of lower Manhattan on September 22, after blocking traffic along Broadway for hours as part of a climate change rally. The protest included a brief march as well as a sit-in and was timed to coincide with the well-attended People’s Climate March on September 21, as well as the United Nations’ Climate Change Summit, which was set to begin on September 23.

By Leigh Haugh

Other Articles Written by This Author:

Guardian Liberty Voice–Leigh Haugh

Sources:
Wall Street Journal
CNN
Fox News
White House–Official Press Release
New York Times

6 Responses to "Climate Change Takes New York City by Storm"

  1. Michael Schultheiss   September 25, 2014 at 10:12 am

    Excellent work, Leigh! Let us hope that the relevant policymakers take the hint, eh?

    Reply
    • Leigh Haugh   September 25, 2014 at 10:20 am

      Thank you, Michael. From your lips….Policymakers will be forced to deal with the issue sooner or later. Let us hope for all our sakes and that of the planet, they come around sooner rather than later.

      Reply
      • Michael Schultheiss   September 25, 2014 at 12:12 pm

        Exactly! I do believe that the future of civilization as we know it depends on us getting this right, by which I mean shifting away from fossil fuels and toward alternative energy sources.

        Of course, there are also so many species at stake, so for the sake of biodiversity we need to act or leave the next generation with a biologically impoverished world.

        Reply
        • Leigh Haugh   September 25, 2014 at 12:38 pm

          Echoing my sentiments, Mike!! The future is most definitely in alternative energy sources. Solar, wind, & hydro…That is our planet’s saving grace! Currently, the biggest impediment to these sources lie in the expense. If we bite the “bullet” as a nation and develop more of these sources, they will become much less expensive to procure and operate. I applaud President Obama’s attempts to put this most serious issue front & center.

          In terms of flora and fauna, we are already at risk of a biologically impoverished nation. Hopefully, we can make strides as a nation and global community to repair the damage.

          Reply
          • Michael Schultheiss   September 25, 2014 at 1:24 pm

            Exactly: it is *some* expense up front (though it will also create jobs and boost the economy), and there are people with very compelling vested interests in the fossil fuel economy.

            Regarding biodiversity, personally, I take some hope from proposals to clone back the Passenger Pigeon (and of course, the development of the technology that has made this feasible). Apparently it is actually something we could do–and who knows what could be next?

            We can’t undo all the damage, but it’s encouraging to me that the cause of conservation has gained a lot of traction in our society.

          • Leigh Haugh   September 25, 2014 at 5:47 pm

            Very good points, Mike. Let us not forget cloning Dolly the Sheep, either. Nearly 20 years later, imagine what our current technology could accomplish.

            I often wonder what a consortium of some of the richest individuals, such as Warren Buffett, Richard Branson, Bill Gates, Donald Trump, etc., could accomplish if they dedicated some of their wealth to the development of alternative energy sources. Especially if it was spearheaded by someone like Al Gore, who is deeply committed and invested in developing alternative energy sources. Imagine the possibilities!

Your Thoughts?