In the United States, Obesity Rates Are Higher Than Ever

In the United States, Obesity Rates Are Higher Than Ever

In the United States, the rate of obesity is higher than ever and also in more states. It rose in adults in six states and did not fall in any in 2013. Now in at least 20 states, which is the most in history, at least 30 percent of adults are considered obese, stated a research report that was released on Thursday.

The deductions were reported by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and were constructed from federal government information. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention described on Thursday that obesity rates were in range from just over 21 percent in Colorado to a high of just over 35 percent in both West Virginia and Mississippi.

The main frequency of obesity happened in the South and Midwest with both regions being around 30 percent. This was followed by the Northeast which was listed at nearly 27 percent and the West at just about 25 percent, according to the CDC. These brand new numbers propose that the obesity problems in the U.S. appear to be getting worse in spite of extensive national publicity about America’s obesity epidemic. From the years 2011 to 2012, in comparison, the obesity rate only increased in one state.

Adult obesity rates also increased in Tennessee, New Jersey, Wyoming, Idaho, Alaska and Delaware. Obesity in adults is defined as having a body mass index or BMI of 30 or more. In order to come up with a body’s BMI, it is calculated by dividing a person’s weight by his or her height and then square it. In order to be considered overweight, a person’s BMI is between 25 to 29.9.

The rates of obesity lingered at about one-third of the American adult population, while around two-thirds were considered overweight. Rates of obesity in childhood seem to have leveled off at the present time, with approximately one in three age 2 to 19-year-olds being considered overweight or obese in 2012. That is in comparison to rates over the past decade.

The leaders of the obesity research study also tracked demographics, which showed higher levels of obesity related to living in poverty. That had been linked with lower availability of healthy foods and safe regions where individuals can walk for exercise and kids can play outside. Over 75 percent of African Americans are considered overweight or obese when compared with around 67 percent of whites.

One-third of adults who make less than $15,000 annually are obese compared to one-quarter who make at least $50,000 a year. The rate of obesity is higher than ever. It rose in adults in six states and did not fall in any in 2013. Now in at least 20 states, which is the most in history, at least 30 percent of adults are considered obese, stated a research report that was released on Thursday.

This information was conveyed by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and also came from various pieces of federal government information. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention described on Thursday that obesity rates were in range from a low of just over 21 percent in Colorado to a high of just over 35 percent in both West Virginia and Mississippi.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

UPI News

The N.Y. Daily News

NBC News

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