Dropbox Not Hacked Despite Claims

Dropbox

Dropbox has said that it was not hacked, despite claims that seven million passwords have been stolen. Users now want to know how their passwords have been stolen, especially since passwords for other sites have also been stolen.

The data dump happened anonymously on Monday. Four hundred usernames and passwords were posted on Pastebin.com, and the author stated that this was just the first set. There were almost seven million Dropbox usernames and passwords to share. The hacker then stated he needed support through Bitcoin.

To show that he had gotten into the accounts, the hacker stated he had files, videos and photos from various accounts. Since then, five more posts have appeared with between 100 and 900 user details in each one.

However, security engineer for the firm, Anton Mityagin, believes that the site was not hacked. The details may be correct, though. Mityagin believes that other sources have led to the stealing of the details. It is likely the people have used the same login details for various sites, and the hacker has simply tried the same usernames and passwords for all the different sites. This is very common among users, especially with more and more sites to sign up for online.

He stated that there are measures in place so that any suspicious activity is detected. Passwords are automatically reset when anything like this happens. The list of usernames and passwords were even checked again the database the company holds, and the accounts are reportedly not associated with the company. It supports the idea that Dropbox was not hacked, despite the hacker’s claims.

Similar problems happened last month. Millions of Gmail accounts were reportedly hacked when email addresses and passwords were shared online. It turned out that the passwords were not gained through Google itself. Most of the information was out of date, or gained through third-party websites.

The good news is that those Dropbox passwords that did work have been deactivated. That means accounts are safe; at least for now. Users still want answers to understand how their passwords had been stolen.

Many smaller apps and websites may be to blame. The security is not as tight on these types of applications and websites, which is why hackers will target them. Those who use the same password on their Dropbox account as well as other accounts should consider changing their passwords, even if they have not been a victim of the recent attack. It is best to keep passwords different for all accounts to avoid something like this happening in the future.

Hackers have also started sharing teasers of the information and then ask for Bitcoin donations. The plan does not seem to help make them rich very quickly. This week’s hack led to the anonymous user getting just eight cents in donations, according to reports. The recent nude photo scandal reportedly brought in just $120 for one of the collectors of the images. It was nothing compared to the amount he spent to get the images.

While the plans seem to backfire for the hackers, it does not make people feel any safer. The best thing to do is avoid reusing passwords on various sites. That is how the Dropbox passwords were stolen, because the company want not hacked despite the hacker’s claims.

By Alexandria Ingham

Sources:

PC World

Slate

CNET

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