Samsung Galaxy S6 Nine Small but Useful Functions

Samsung Galaxy S6

Samsung Galaxy S6, the new flagship of the South Korean smartphone maker, has nine small but useful functions that users and potential buyers need to know. Debuted in March and made available this month, it is a stunning smartphone – a smooth glass-and-matte-metal handset, with an enhanced fingerprint scanner and a new short key for the camera. Lollipop and many amazing specs make it an Android phone to beat for this year.

Samsung Galaxy S6 is a great beautiful phone from the inside out. While many may have known its enhancements and new features, it has a lot of additional functionalities which can help users maximize the handset, and get the most of it. Over the weekend, Samsung Tomorrow published nine interesting functions about their stunner flagship.

It allows calling even if the screen is locked. That can be most useful during rush times. This shortcut can be done by swiping the screen’s lower left to show the Phone icon.

Accessing the Quick Panel on the Security Lock Screen is now possible. This shortcut can disable or enable Quick Panel functions, or get a Wi-Fi connection without the need to unlock Samsung Galaxy S6. This shortcut can come in handy too when the need arises. For instance, when one is in an important conference and the phone’s screen needs to be dimmed quickly.

Organizing of apps in folder is possible and easier. Dragging an app on top of another brings the user to a new folder. Also possible is changing of the home screen theme. Themes give the phone and its user a unique aura. The user can simply go to Settings, and choose a theme.

Gallery Favorites can already be accessed easily without going through the tedious scrolling through the Gallery. It will be easier for the user to find his amazing vacation photos, or his best selfie, once they have been added to Favorites.

One of the Samsung Galaxy S6 nine small but useful functions is easy access to the six important apps while on a call. While on a phone call, Samsung Galaxy S6 allows easy access to Internet, contacts, SMS, email, memo and s-planner. This makes the user more productive and enables him to do other things with the phone. He can browse the Internet, search, or email someone while talking on the phone.

The Music App is made simpler. On its upper left corner is the “Playlists” menu that goes with Albums, Artists, Composers, Folders, Genres and Tracks. The mini player focuses on the basics only, such as, Play, Rewind and Fast-forward. Meanwhile, SoundAlive has a new view, from old square to just two dials for equalizer controls, instrumental, vocal, as well as for bass and treble.

Samsung Galaxy S6 has Enhanced Features for enhanced communication. Enhanced Features has something to do with Contacts, Messages and Share, which help enhance better communication with family and friends. To sign up for Enhanced Features, the user just needs to verify his phone number and enjoy the mentioned features after the easy and quick sign-up process. Aside from the contact name, Profile sharing can then include the contact’s picture, address, birthdate, email address and organization. An option also lets change of settings to share the profile with just a specific group.

Texting can be boring for others. Then, they can switch to Enhanced messaging where they and their friends can chat to each other, one on one; or do group chatting, while exchanging videos and images.

Samsung Galaxy S6 introduces a new type of Screen Lock, the Direction Lock, as one of its nine small but useful functions. When having trouble with accessibility, or in drawing the right pattern often, the new type of screen lock may work: Settings, Personal, Accessibility (Lock screen and security), Direction Lock and Create a series of directions. The user is allowed to mix four to eight directions for the Direction Lock, which can be Vibration or Sound feedback, Read drawn directions aloud or Show directions.

By Judith Aparri





Photo courtesy of SamsungTomorrow – Creativecommons Flickr License

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