‘AD: The Bible Continues’ Will Bring Religious Awareness

AD: The Bible Continues

Grey’s Anatomy, Gossip Girl, The Walking Dead and Supernatural are just a handful of shows that modern audiences binge watch and tune into television for. Other than frequent stories in news outlets, there is not much talk of religion on TV because modern audiences do not typically look for such a serious matter in entertainment outlets. Even reality television hardly brings issues of faith into the picture. That is where the nature of AD: The Bible Continues stands out, as it will bring religious awareness. The NBC show is based on the New Testament book of Acts, and does include some added drama and history. With a show like this, audiences have a chance to tune into television that teaches them more about the dynamics of biblical times. AD: The Bible Continues serves to bring religious awareness to the modern generation.

Singer and actor Pat Boone is ecstatic about the opportunity that AD: The Bible Continues gives to audiences. “People are spiritually hungry” and “looking for answers” he says. He is glad that there is biblically-based entertainment available for people to learn from. Indeed, it is important that there is this kind variety added to modern television. The show is based on the serious topics of history and faith, and is formulated to fit television in ways that modern audiences are familiar with.

The benefits extend to other religious outlets. While some religious authorities worry about audiences being confused by the show’s content blurring the actual stories and messages in scriptures, others see the situation more optimistically. Sermons based off the show’s theme are presented in church. Numerous people tune into the show, which will increase participation in sermons that keep up with it. Pastor Mark Rounsaville of the Baptist Temple in Springfield, Missouri sees the advantage of the show and the ability to “capitalize on its attention.” Furthermore, the sermons give Rounsaville the ability to correct or clarify anything that is inaccurate in the show, and educate audiences about what the Bible actually says. It even seems that so far, the show has actually been consistent with the gospels. Overall, the Christian community is excited about the show. AD: The Bible Continues, which brings about religious awareness.

A show like AD: The Bible Continues can aid in educating audiences that are unaware or misinformed about biblical history. Whether it is a show, or better yet, a book, or a pamphlet, it is useful for audiences to be aware of biblical history so that there can be a better understanding amongst Christians and non-Christians in a diverse society. Even if there are very few Christians in a community, it is vital that people learn more about the faith’s basis so that they do not misunderstand it, or bring misinformed ideas to the table. That way, it is easier for people of different faiths to understand each other and reduce any friction that may occur between them.

While reality TV continues to focus on twisting the lives of ordinary people for the sake of entertainment, and to show off the excesses of the rich, there is a scripted nonfiction category that can offer rich content. Shows like AD: The Bible Continues, and even films like Exodus may be scripted and have added drama to fill in gaps, but they hold historical content and get audiences thinking about historical accuracy and religion. The show should at least intrigue audiences to seek historical knowledge, and even attempt to understand different faiths. AD: The Bible Continues serves as a vessel for a show that will bring about religious awareness.

By Tania Dawood

Edited by Chanel van der Woodsen


Las Vegas Review Journal- NBC’s ‘A.D.: The Bible Continues’ doubles as sermons for viewers

Christian Post- Pat Boone Says ‘A.D.: The Bible Continues’ is Fighting Every Kind of Moral Depravity on TV

Christianity Today- ‘A.D.: The Bible Continues’: Fiction and Fact

Featured Photo Courtesy of Wonderlane’s Flickr Page – Creative Commons License

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