South Africa Al-Bashir Slipped Out of the Country

South Africa

South Africa President Omar Al-Bashir, slipped out of the country, has left Johannesburg, and is expected to land in the Sudanese capital Khartoum this evening. Sudan’s State Minister confirmed that President Al-Bashir will address the crowds gathered to meet him on his return.

Al-Bashir stands accused in connection with crimes committed in Darfur which lead to the murder of almost a half-a-million civilians and displacement of millions. The International Criminal Court (ICC) instructed the South African government to arrest Al-Bashir, who arrived in the country over the weekend to attend the African Union Summit.

The South African government undermined the judicial system and challenged the court’s decision. President Jacob Zuma let a precious moment pass to bring justice to the millions that died in Darfur. Opposition party, the Democratic Alliance, called for the arrest of Al-Bashir but failed to achieve this end of justice. From the onset of the arrival of Al-Bashir, the bid by the South African Litigation center to have the Sudenese president arrested was an exercise of futility.

Zuma said that all international delegates attending the African Union Summit were given diplomatic immunity and as such could not be arrested. The ruling party, the African National Congress (ANC), said that the ICC is no longer a useful organization and holds the view that it is a court of last resort for the prosecution of crimes against humanity. The unwavering commitment from countries in African and Eastern-Europe to uphold human rights, continue to bear the brunt of ICC decisions, and the most recent is the Sudanese example.

Al-Bashir was allowed to return home unchecked, and South Africa’s decision will be severely condemned internationally and not so loud throughout the African Continent. It will be a massive blow to the credibility of the ICC. On the other hand, if South Africa did concede to the demands of the ICC and arrest Al-Bashir, African leaders would condemn the action. The South African government would be accused of ensnaring African leaders into a set-up. Should the ICC leave African problems to the African leaders? The ICC would now have to go to Sudan to arrest Al-Bashir and will probably realize that there is more unity among African leaders than the west.

Zuma, the president of South Africa should be charged with aiding and abating the escape of a murder, after South African President Al-Bashire slipped out of the country. There must have been an over flight and landing request provided by the South African Defense force, prior to the departure of Al-Bashir. Zuma and the ANC government are accessories to the genocide of more than 300,000 Africans. Zuma should have detained Al-Bashir and sent him to the United States for trial for the gruesome crimes committed.

South Africans have turned the entire Al-Bashir escapism into a racist argument and comments on social media state that Africans do not want the president of Sudan arrested because he is black. Crimes of the past do not matter and the current state of the country being in shambles is of no concern. There is a peace process presently being facilitated between Sudan and Southern Sudan, including the rebels. Although people are displaced and subjected to extreme poverty, the only hope for peace and stability is through the current process of negotiation. The Sudanese people want to restore the broken life into a peaceful future, and the fact may be Al-Bashir is the key to that process.

Al-Bashir is a dictator who committed murderous crimes and the ICC has not issued a warrant for arrest, based on color, and now he has slipped out of the country of South Africa. Many feel that it is time for African-American people to get over the issue of race and stop discriminating against themselves. Playing the worn out dog-eared race card could actually be making a mockery of black people who are comfortable with the race and culture. Many of the people there understand that all is equal under the law, and everything else for that matter. Despite race, if Africans love dictators then so be it, let the people not condemn, but the facts about Al-Bashir still remain.

By Laura Oneale


Timeslive – Sudans Bashir in South Africa leaving Monday
News24 – Five Ports of entry did not get Al-Bashir Court Order
ABC New – Sudan State News Agency President Omar Al Bashir Left South Africa
Photo Courtesy of U.S. Navy Flickr Page – Public Domain License

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