Sam’s Club and Walmart Recall Beef Sold Nationwide

recallSam’s Club and its parent company Walmart have recalled about 89,000 pounds of beef fearing the meat may be contaminated with wood. The beef is sold as Sam’s Choice Black Angus Vidalia Onion Patties. The wood originated with an incoming ingredient and was discovered during production. These items were shipped to retailers nationwide. Although no illness have been reported, the beef should not be consumed.

According to a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) release, Huisken Meat Company of Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, recalled the meat, which was produced between Nov. 19 and Dec. 9. The frozen beef renders establishment number “EST. 394A” with use-by dates of May 17, May 29 and June 6, 2016. Customers who have purchased the product should return it to the store or throw it away. The beef was recently shipped to Sam’s Club and Walmart stores nationwide.

In the United States, Black Angus is the most common breed of beef cattle. In 2005, there were 324,266 animals registered. In 2014, the British Cattle Movement Service named Angus the second most popular beef breed overall and the United Kingdom’s most popular native beef breed. Certified Angus Beef standards were developed in 1978 in order to specify a particular level of age, tenderness, color and marbling for the meat that qualified for the Angus Beef label. This particular beef is known for its finely marbled meat, which means that the fat is dispersed evenly against the actual cut of meat. This marbling trait of Angus cattle generally creates a more tender, juicy and flavorful meat than other breeds.

However, not all Angus Beef is created equal hence the different labels and categories which represent the quality of this particular beef. The highest quality is Certified Angus Beef because of the rigorous standards required for the meat to pass before earning the label. The USDA uses certain standards in recallorder to identify the beef. The terms used are prime, choice and select. Prime is the highest quality meat and, therefore, the best cut of meat is labeled “Certified Angus Prime.”

A meat manager, who preferred to remain nameless, said if there were two steaks which were the same cut and cooked at the same time, it is doubtful that a person would truly be able to tell the difference between the two. He said when comparing two pieces of raw beef, it is difficult to tell the difference between Angus and regular beef. The only identifying factor is that Angus Beef comes in boxes labeled accordingly. The meat manager, who has been in business for 37 years, also said that people often claim to taste a difference, but believes he could construct an impartial taste test that would prove that to be unfounded.

The Angus Beef which was recalled by Sam’s Club and Walmart stores nationwide was produced at Huisken Meat Company, a supplier of both beef and pork patties. The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify that recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. FSIS is the public health agency in the USDA. Once the retail distribution list is available it will be posted on the FSIS website at   This particular Sam’s Club and Walmart recall involves about 89,000 pounds of beef.

By Cherese Jackson (Virginia)


ABC 12: Beef recalled over wood-trace concerns
The Columbus Dispatch: Frozen beef patties sold at Wal-Mart recalled, contaminated with wood
Lifestyle: Ultimate Guide to Black Angus Steak

Photo Credits:

Top Image Courtesy of frankieleon – Flickr License
Inline Image Courtesy of Walmart – Flickr License
Featured Image Courtesy of Nicholas Eckhart – Flickr License

One Response to "Sam’s Club and Walmart Recall Beef Sold Nationwide"

  1. hollymolley   January 7, 2016 at 4:44 am

    Could it be that wood fiber is used as a cheap filler to make the beef supply go further and increase profits ? And further could it be that in the process of adding the wood fiber that the size of the added wood allowed it to be identified by the consumer ? Adding adjuncts to stretch product and increase profit is common and in many cases FDA approved. We surly believe that profit over safety was in no way part of this occurrence. You believe that, don’t you ?


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