Sexually Transmitted Demons a Menace Say Teen Exorcists

Sexually Transmitted Demons a Menace Say Teen Exorcists

Demons can be sexually transmitted, say three young exorcists, and when it happens, it can be a real menace. The girls, who hail from Phoenix, Arizona, are featured in a new documentary by film Vice.com. They travel all over the world, meeting with people who have been afflicted with what they say are sexually transmitted demons, and commanding those demons to leave the person alone. The ringleader, Brynn Larson, was raised by televangelist Bob Larson, who claims he recently cured a man of a homosexual curse and the demon inside him. The elder Larson believes that about 50% of the entire world’s population is possessed by demons.

There are many ways to be infected with a demon, say the girls, but the biggest causes are sexual abuse and drug addiction. It is also possible, they say, to catch a demon by having sex with prostitutes, being physical or emotionally abused, and by sinning.

The documentary highlights the girls’ recent trip to the Ukraine, where drug addiction and prostitution along with a belief in the supernatural, are both prevalent. Touring through small mining towns, the girls look for those who have suffered sexual, physical and emotional abuse at the hands of loved ones.

In one church featured in the documentary, many members of the congregation were in tears and several of them lined up, sobbing, in front of the exorcism team. Bob Larson proceeded to have them repeat the abuse they had suffered, such as “my daddy beat me” and “my uncle raped me” and then he screamed several commands at the demons, including “you stand up and face me!” and pressed a crucifix into the foreheads of the afflicted. There was much screaming, crying, groaning and hissing. One woman put up her hands, making the shape of claws, as she growled.

Luckily, though, it seems that the demons, according the younger Larson, “can’t just go into anybody they want to; they have to have a legal right.” But don’t relax just yet, because “if you sin, if you start doing drugs,” then you will have “stepped out of the umbrella of God’s protection,” and are vulnerable to catching a demon. And if you’re abused, sexually or otherwise, “you can’t help it,” says Larson, “because of the feelings that it brings, because of the hate and the hurt and the shame, Satan can attack you.”

The three girls shun all things related to “Harry Potter, witchcraft, violence, Twilight…horror movies, and sexual stuff.” When asked if they ever have guilty feelings about having to upset people, they say no, but they do get “angry at the Devil” for inflicting people with shame and hatred. Larson, especially, says that she becomes furious at Satan for what he has done to her exorcism clients. “I just get like… how dare Satan do that to them? And I just want to go after that demon and get him. It’s not guilt, because you’re helping them,” she says proudly.

The Orthodox Church of the Ukraine feels differently however. The official stance of the Orthodox Church is that the exorcisms are not real. A priest interviewed for the documentary says “It’s a business that maybe brings some profit to them, like an advertisement.”

After the trip to the Ukraine, the girls will move on to Russia before continuing their world tour. Sexually transmitted demons are a menace, say these young teen exorcists, and they stand ever ready to defeat Satan. The full-length documentary is available to be viewed at the link below.

By: Rebecca Savastio

Source 1