Ted Nugent Using Nazi Code?

Ted Nugent
In a Feb.18 CNN Wolf Blitzer interview, Wayne Slater of the Dallas Morning News puts forward the question of whether or not GOP boy Ted Nugent was using a sort of dog-whistle or code for like-minded Republican voters when he referred to President Barack Obama as a “subhuman mongrel” in a mid-January on-camera interview. These are words used in the Nazi literature of WWII. These words in particular have been the focus of the backlash against Nugent, a rock musician known for being a staunch Republican. Nugent was not supported by all of his Republican political representatives, by any stretch. Senator Rand Paul, for instance, who some feel by other of his actions is making a clear bid to run for President in 2016, is one who stated he finds Nugent’s words about the president offensive. Greg Abbott, candidate for governor of Texas, however, at first denied knowing Nugent’s history of saying incendiary things and did not publicly condemn the rocker for his choice of words, despite the fact that Nugent has been representing Abbott on his campaign trail.

Many in the Press have not singled out other of Nugent’s inflammatory words used in the same interview, where he refers to Obama as a “Communist” repeatedly, also calling him a “gangster” and “chimpanzee.” Nugent gave said interview at a gun fair. Some say he is an entertainer who was trying to entertain. These people, however, are not the ones pointing out the Nazi rhetoric used in the seemingly coded, almost-monologue Ted Nugent performed on camera. In the Wolf Blitzer interview referenced above, Julius Streicher’s Der Stürmer articles are mentioned, where Jewish people are referred to as mongrels, and being a mongrel is synonymous with being evil. Blitzer read some of Streicher’s diatribe out loud, which has Jewish forebears including “Mongolians” and “Negroes.” If one goes further than Streicher, a prominent WWII Nazi who founded the paper that became a Nazi propaganda tool, there is additional material—a speech given by Heinrich Himmler. Himmler was addressing fellow SS leaders at a group meeting in Posen, Nazi-occupied Poland, in 1943. This document was used at the Nuremberg trials.

Himmler’s speech, which also contains the words “subhuman” and “mongrel,” refers additionally to “Communists” and “Russians” as being subhuman, even going so far as to say all Slavic people are capable of horrible monstrosities including carrying their neighbor’s liver in their lunch bag. One cannot know if Ted Nugent is familiar with the Nazi speech and its code, or if he intended to use the terminology in a similar way when referring to President Barack Obama. Himmler said in the Posen speech that American soldiers are not very brave. He compares “subhumans” to animals, and advocates for Aryan Germans, after the war is won by Germany, to reproduce as much as they can to outnumber all other races.

Ted Nugent has eight children by reportedly six or even seven mothers. Not all of the circumstances are clear, but two were born before his first marriage and were given up for adoption separately as infants, not knowing that the other existed. He then had two more with his first wife, who died in a car crash three years after Nugent began a relationship with an underage Hawaiian girl who he could not marry and so convinced her parents to sign legal guardianship over to him. He then married his current wife, Shemane Deziel, in 1989, and they have one child together. In 1995 Nugent fathered a child out-of-wedlock and was later sued for child support, which he is now paying. Nazi or not, Ted Nugent has said publicly on several occasions that he has never used drugs in his life, but under current scrutiny the fact is coming to the fore that twice as a younger man he admitted in interviews (Detroit Free Press and High Times) to draft-dodging during Vietnam by pretending to be crazy—not by speaking in code, but by not washing for several days before his interview, taking meth-amphetamines (speed), and urinating and defecating in his pants over days, leaving it there to build up.

No one but Ted Nugent can say whether or not he intended to use some sort of perverse Nazi code to indicate feeling a supremacy of race akin to the Nazi movement. Still, when choosing him as a supporter one wonders that various Republicans claim to not have been familiar with his history of rash, lewd and even violent comments against women, Democrats and other races. He has been aggressive and inflammatory as well as unpredictable. If there is one thing about him that would not fit in with Nazi behavior, it would be his lack of discipline and decorum, especially when under scrutiny. Nugent has apologized to the president, claiming the words “subhuman” and “mongrel” are included in street fighting terminology. A thorough online search shows no such fact at this time.

Editorial by Julie Mahfood

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