‘Hoarders’ Update on Lifetime Could Revive Show

hoarders

Will Hoarders be signed on for another season? Only time will. To test out ratings and viewer interest, Lifetime is expected to air a Hoarders Where Are They Now special on June 2. In an interview with Cory Chalmers, he could not provide any details on specific successes or failures that will be highlighted on the update show. He said, “We don’t want to ruin any surprises,” but he hopes that it can help revive the show.

Hoarders is a guilty pleasure for some viewers. It is almost difficult to look away as the show features people who receive help clearing out massive amounts of clutter and junk and have new hope that they can live a normal life again. There is the disgust factor, which leaves viewers in awe at how people can actually let things get that bad and live in that kind of filth. It elicits an emotional aspect, as well, as it shares the struggles that people have gone through that led them to hoarding in the first place and their troubled relationships that are often rebuilt during the process of the clean-out.

The TV show is a first step in getting people the help they need, but much of the show is about cleaning out the actually clutter and regaining use of the home. What ultimately determines their long-term outcome is the aftercare that takes place. With a 97 percent recidivism rate associated with hoarding, failure is likely without additional support.

“Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is the only therapy that has been proven beneficial for hoarding behaviors. However, it is important to understand that hoarding is the result of one or more underlying disorders, so if Cory Chalmers Hoardersthose issues are worked on through therapy, the hoarding tends to decrease by itself,” said Chalmers, who has been regularly featured on the show as a cleanup and hoarding expert. It also helps to have support from family and friends who understand that it is a process and will take time to work through. Hoarding is certainly not cured over the few days that the show covers each person.

For those who wonder how many of the people featured on Hoarders have been able to follow through on aftercare and keep their homes clean, they will finally get the updates.  While each episode featured an update on the person featured during that episode and whether they took advantage of the extra help being offered to them, it interests people to know the long-term outcome and how these people fare over time.

Chalmers said that the Hoarders Where Are They Now show will likely feature a mixed bag of results, to include those who have been successful after the airing of the show and those who still struggle with the illness and have returned to hoarding. “There will always be those that refuse the aftercare provided by the show,” he said. “Unfortunately, this is no different than an alcoholic allowing someone to take their bottle away and thinking they are cured!”

Hoarders was canceled in 2013 after airing for six seasons, but there has been an ongoing effort to revive the show and bring it back to TV. There is a big following for the show because people can either relate on some level or they are drawn to viewing the homes filled with a variety of collectibles, junk and downright nasty stuff. Lifetime recently bought Hoarders. If ratings are high enough for the Hoarders Where Are They Now show, “there is a very real possibility that they will order another season of Hoarders,” Chalmers said.

By Tracy Rose

Today
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