Lasers May Soon Regrow Teeth

Lasers May Soon Regrow Teeth

In the future the dentist might only need a laser to repair or regrow a person’s teeth when he or she comes for a check-up. Scientists at the Wyss Institute located at Harvard University found that lasers may be able to regrow injured parts of teeth by using a kind of laser therapy which is noninvasive to hasten stem cells to restart the growth of dental tissue. This is started in a new research study printed up in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

The idea behind the laser treatment is using low-power laser treatment to restructure dentin, which is the tissue similar to bone found inside of teeth. David J. Mooney, who is a faculty member at Harvard, stated that the research is basically a matter of putting together all the dots.

The scientific community is vigorously looking for many different ways of using stem cells for tissue rejuvenation efforts, explained Mooney. He and his group have added an inventive and oddly simple but strong tool to the research study. Researchers want to figure out if definite wavelengths of light could create specific kinds of heating assets when absorbed into detailed parts of the body.

While dentists routinely attempt to fix damaged teeth by using crowns, veneers and fillings made from synthetic materials, the researchers are attempting to turn the dental stem cells into dentin. The team wants to see if they can trigger body proteins in the body known as growth factors and use them to influence the stem cells.

During the research study, the group examined their discoveries on rats by drilling holes into the rodents’ molars and then using the laser therapy to begin the formation of dentin. The group shined the lasers on the teeth, which produced caps on the molars. They found that the chief link throughout their course of testing was the cell protein known as transforming growth factor beta-1 and generated regeneration of tissue. There was better-quality dentin formation created and discovered twelve weeks later when the teeth were looked at by x-ray imaging.

It is believed that the laser treatment started a chain reaction by activating one molecule, which prompted another, until the stem cells were all stimulated. The research team explained that tracking this reaction allows them to prove the efficiency of the laser on the various rats’ teeth.

The group thinks they may be able to take this method of laser therapy, known as low level light therapy, to trigger cells which are located in other areas of the body and create parallel results. They are wanting to start human trials as soon as possible and are at present setting up specific safety regulations with the National Institutes of Health.

So in the future the dentist might only need a laser to repair a person’s tooth when he or she comes for a check-up. Scientists at Harvard University have found that lasers may be able to regrow injured parts of teeth by using a kind of laser therapy which is noninvasive to hasten stem cells to restart the growth of dental tissue.

By Kimberly Ruble

Sources:

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