Home » Trump’s Nasty Death Threat to Mitch McConnell

Trump’s Nasty Death Threat to Mitch McConnell

Trump
Courtesy of Daniel Huizinga (Flickr CC0)

The conflict between former President Trump and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has brought back the former president’s propensity for using foul words.

Trump’s most recent attack was the scary claim that McConnell needed a “DEATH WISH” just for supporting some Democratic-backed legislation. The comment, which was made on the Truth Social platform on Friday, has received some criticism from people outside of the liberal and Democratic communities.

The remark will also enhance the toxicity of a political climate in which many legislators are already implementing security measures in response to rising violent threats.

The Wall Street Journal’s editorial pages, which are consistently conservative, criticized the “DEATH WISH” remark as being “ugly even by Mr. Trump’s standards.”

Trump “always puts himself first, and with this speech, he may actually put others at risk of harm,” the editors of the Journal warned.

At a gathering on Monday at Syracuse University, Rep. Liz Cheney referred to the former president’s comments as “an extremely terrible, racial attack.” The claim of racism was made in connection to words used by Trump in the same post that were directed at Elaine Chao, the wife of McConnell and a Taiwanese-born woman.

On January 6, the chairman of the House select committee, Rep. Bennie Thompson, on which Cheney also sits, referred to Trump’s remarks as “inflammatory and bigoted.” They “may inspire political violence,” Thompson added.

Given that the country is already experiencing an increase in threats — and worse — against politicians and other political figures, those are sadly realistic warnings.

Trump
Courtesy of Jaysin Trevino (Flickr CC0)

In recent months, two men have been accused of felony stalking of Congressional Progressive Caucus Chairwoman Pramila Jayapal and attempted murder of conservative Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. At a campaign event, a different guy assaulted the Republican candidate for governor Lee Zeldin.

Brett Forsell allegedly arrived at Jayapal’s house in the Jayapal case, armed and shouting profanities. He entered a not-guilty plea.

In the Kavanaugh case, Nicholas Roske, 26, was detained after making a cross-country trip to the justice’s house. Roske was allegedly found in possession of a gun and ammo. He has also entered a not guilty plea.

According to a New York Times analysis released on Saturday, the number of threats made against lawmakers between 2016 and 2021 increased by roughly ten times. According to The Times’ study of threats that led to prosecutions, more than one-third were made by Trump or GOP followers against their ideological rivals, while over one-quarter were made by Democrats and were directed at conservatives or Republicans.

The remaining items lacked an ideological category. In the Times article, parliamentarians from all political stripes were also mentioned as voicing concern. The Democratic representative from New York, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, told the newspaper that her office receives an “astronomical” number of threats and expressed concern that the widespread issue will not receive the attention it deserves “until someone gets hurt.”

“I wouldn’t be astonished if a senator or a member of the House were slain,” Sen. Susan Collins told the Times, lamenting the “erosion of any boundaries of what is acceptable behavior.”

Trump has frequently referred to McConnell as an “old crow” and a “hack politician,” among other things, in his tirades against him. The Senate minority leader and those closest to him hardly ever respond to Trump’s jabs. They think doing so will simply stoke the media fury that the former president feeds off of.

For the most part, Republican elected officials have refrained from criticizing Trump’s comments.

Sen. Rick Scott, the leader of the Senate Republicans’ fundraising committee, stated only that he would “do my best to bring folks together” on CBS’s “Face the Nation” on Sunday.

Scott added that Trump “likes to give people nicknames” while stating that it is “never ever OK to be a racist” on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

Before Trump, it would have been unimaginable for the Senate GOP to have made such a tepid response to a former president making an implicit threat against its leader.

But after six years, everything has changed, just like a lot of other things.

Heidi Beirich, co-founder of the Global Project Against Hate and Extremism, criticized Trump for his continued use of aggressive and deadly language. “It’s horrible that he’s using such aggressive language about other individuals again.”

Invoking the French idea of a barrier Sanitaire, Beirich claimed that “it has just crumbled, and collapsed primarily on the right.” A cordon sanitaire is essentially an agreement that certain ideas, ideologies, or threats must be banned from the political discourse for the sake of the common good.

We have never seen somebody like Donald Trump, claimed American University history professor Allan Lichtman. A current or past president’s willingness to threaten and encourage violence has never been witnessed before. With regard to the prospect of political violence, Lichtman contended that “bothsidesism” was unreliable.

According to Lichtman, attacks on Republicans “are not instigated by a past president, and I don’t see that they were instigated by any senior Democratic leader.”
Conservatives argue that there is too much of a correlation between Trump’s rhetoric and actual violence. Additionally, they contend that Democratic leaders are to blame for a deterioration in political discourse and risky exaggeration, such as when President Biden recently compared components of Trump’s “MAGA” populism to “semi-fascism.”

However the distribution of blame is done, and the situation is dire and only getting worse. Credible threats of political violence “predominate on the far-right fringe to a tremendous extent,” according to Beirich. However, she continued, “I do think we have normalized the idea that discussing political violence is somehow acceptable.

Written by Gabriel Salgado

Sources:

The Hill: The Memo: Trump’s death wish attack on McConnell sets alarm bells ringing

USA Today: ‘DEATH WISH’? What Trump and his wannabes did in one weekend should scare us all.

Mother Jones: Trump Says McConnell Has “DEATH WISH” In Menacing Post

Top and Featured Image Courtesy of Daniel Huizinga Flickr Page – Creative Commons License

Inset Image Courtesy of Jaysin Trevino Flickr Page – Creative Commons License

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